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  1. #1

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    OK, I already do the quick view under the green safelight trick. Have heard about doing it by infrared. Thought that would be expensive. Had a look on the net and started to wonder (Its been a wet weekend here).

    What I want to know, has anybody done it using the infrared goggles that you can get? Some seem to be as low as $70-100 with a built in infrared light source. I know that a few years ago it was $1,000's, but was thinking, can you apply Moores law of computer's to infrared viewers?

    Any way, let me know what you all think.
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  2. #2
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    Way too complicated for me. I used them in the military and found them to be useless for close work.

    However, your post gave me an idea: Why not develop IR film by inspection under yellow/green light? Anyone tried this? Considering the response spectrum I'll bet it would work, at least for 4x5 and maybe 120.

    Truly, dr bob.

  3. #3
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by dr bob
    However, your post gave me an idea: Why not develop IR film by inspection under yellow/green light? Anyone tried this? Considering the response spectrum I'll bet it would work, at least for 4x5 and maybe 120.
    Yes, I have. Green light, MACO 820c 4x5", Pyrocat-HD 1:1:60, no fogging. I didn't turn on the light until four minutes into the development, then kept it on as the first sheets were developed enough already (exposure by guesswork). Last one was done after 11 minutes, still no fogging.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  4. #4

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    At our lab we use infrared inspection and it has saved many a clients work from under and/or over development. We picked up a pair of Russian surpplus about 8 years ago. We highly recommend the use of this method as even reading 35mm film is simple. The problem we had with using the green safelight (as most have) is that the amount of time you have to view the negative is quite short and takes ALOT of practice to be able to recognize just what you are looking at ( esp w/ roll film) With the infrared inspection you can be viewing the negatives from start to finish w/o any chance of fog. The goggles ran us around $600.00 US and uses two AAA batteries.

  5. #5
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    FYI

    The word 'infrared' gets tossed around quite a bit, but literally means beyond red or the wavelengths of light that are longer than red or greater than about 700 nm (less for 'red color blindness'). Usually, the military is interested in the middle wave infrared (MWIR) and the long wave infrared (LWIR) as these bands don't require illumination. The near infrared is what would be handy in the darkroom, from 700nm to about 1100nm is the most common of the near infrared. This is a very economically band to see, because all consumer electronic imagers (digital cameras, videocams,etc.) are capable of seeing in this band because they use silicon sensors. They actually see better in the near IR than in the visible. However, to make everything look right in your pictures, the manufacturer places an IR cutoff filter over the detector that stops all the 700 nm and beyond light from hitting the detector. If this can be removed (it looks like a light blue filter), any of the electronic cameras can see IR. Of course there is a focus shift in the lens and to see in the dark, you would need an IR source which would either be a tungsten source with a good IR pass filter or an IR light emitting diode. The IR LED is probably cheaper, but I don't know.

    I think there are a few cameras out there that don't have the IR cutoff filter in them. They would be BW surveillance cameras. There is one in most ATM behind that black square. The lack of this filter would give increased sensitivity. There was some talk about these cameras a few years back and their ability to see through some fabrics.

  6. #6

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    Thanks for the info guys

    From what is being said it might be worth some more research.

    There are some cheaper monocular viewers about that sound interesting, just need to make sure that they focus close enough. Either that or spend about $4-500 on some ex miltary ones. They seem to focus down to 10 inches, or 25 cm for those of us in a metric world. Could be handy for that extrem low light stuff :-)

    I will update as I go.
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  7. #7
    Sean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by livemoa
    Thanks for the info guys
    From what is being said it might be worth some more research.
    There are some cheaper monocular viewers about that sound interesting, just need to make sure that they focus close enough. Either that or spend about $4-500 on some ex miltary ones. They seem to focus down to 10 inches, or 25 cm for those of us in a metric world. Could be handy for that extrem low light stuff :-)
    I will update as I go.
    Hi David, I REALLY want to take this route with IR inspection. How have you progressed on it? It sure makes a lot of sense to do it this way. Sure there is the upfront cost, but after that it would prove extremely valuable. My only problem is knowing which goggles or scope to buy. I don't want to buy something expensive that doesn't work well.

  8. #8
    Sean's Avatar
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    I also see there are several types of these googles. 1 gen, 2 gen, 3 gen, 4 gen. The cheaper ones are 1 gen, or 1st generation I think. Is 1 gen good enough for film inspection? I may have a search on the net, try to find other using this method and their IR Equip..

  9. #9

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    I have a pair of Gen-1 goggles ($500 US) and they will focus down to about 12-in (30cm). They have a build-in IR source (necessary in a totally dark darkroom), but this source emits a tiny amount of visible light in the red (very faint). If you get a pair of goggles, I would use a separate IR source such as this: http://www.maxmax.com/aXNiteFlashlight.htm I used the goggles for a while to aid in loading sheet film but got better at loading and can load in total darkness without them, now.

  10. #10
    Sean's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info, so the ir source on the googles emits a little visible light, but the ir flash lights emit no visible light? I found a gen1 mono google on ebay today for 280US that looked pretty good.

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