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  1. #21

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    336
    I have huge horizontal cameras here, but what the manufacturer of my camera suggests when micron tramming isn't an option(special $$$$$ equipment which guarantees that corner to corner the negative back is exactly parallel to the copy board) use a premanufatured grid like the translucent mini-cutting pads at craft stores. Now not only can you take clean measurements, generally at an enlargement so the errors are exagerated, I use a 1/100 inch ruler to be sure all lines are equal, also check the diagonals, and finally you can calibrate % of enlargement or reduction.
    Embrace **it! **it. . .just another name for fertilizer. . . Grow baby Grow!

  2. #22

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    336
    Sorry, after re-reading, I see I forgot to say, cut the cutting mat and treat like a negative for these purposes.
    Embrace **it! **it. . .just another name for fertilizer. . . Grow baby Grow!

  3. #23
    AllanD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Wiltshire,UK
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    This weekend, I've had a go at aligning my enlargers. This is what I found...

    Using the mirror method is made much easier if you have a prism to look through. I've just pulled apart an old pair of conventional binoculars and used one of the prisms. With this addition, the mirror method of enlargment is very easy to perform.

    I'm lucky enough to have a machine setters level, which is what I have used in the past. These are very expensive calibrated levels that are very sensitive. When I compared the alignment using the two methods, they came out very close. However, the level method is a pain, as finding a surface to use as a reference is difficult.

    As of now, I'm using the mirror method.

  4. #24
    ksmattfish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Lawrence, KS
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian_greant
    Here is one I've read about but haven't done yet (even though my enlarger is slightly out of alignment)

    1) expose a negative on a blank wall, grey card, what ever. and process it
    2) scratch a small "x" in each corner of the negative
    3) put it in the appropriate negative carrier and in the enlarger (duh)
    4) Check focus in each corner and adjust until all are equally in focus.

    comments?
    I use this method, although I just pick a "junk" neg to scratch, and check the focus with my grain magnifier.

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