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  1. #11
    lee
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    I think Juan is close to the answer here. I know for a fact that those mechanical timers are not accurate under 5 seconds. I have seen that. I have used Picker's method in the past and now I don't. I think Picker was selling timers. I think doesn't make any difference if you are consistent with your methodology.

    lee\c

  2. #12
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  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by juan
    Also, I should add that Picker used a Zone VI cold light head that had a sensor inside. The sensor connected to the timer - it actually timed the light output so that each "3-second" exposure put out the same amount of light.

    Fred frequently said "Same is the same and different is different." I wondered sometimes if he was being far too picky.

    I don't think it matters much what you do so long as you develop a consistent procedure, get good results, the follow that procedure. Although, if you are printing a lot of prints from a given negative, you can run into inconsistent light output. Fred said that problem is what led him to have the Zone VI head developed.
    juan
    I have one of the cold light stabilizers that Horowitz developed with Fred Picker's input and guidance on what was needed. I haven't used it in some time since I no longer use a cold light head. I did find, however, that cold light sources are subject to light stabilization problems that other light sources are somewhat immune to. The cold light stabilizer worked very effectively to solve these fluctuations.

    If one is only doing "one offs" of prints it is unlikely that these fluctuations would be noticeable...Make a couple of dozen of an image and one quickly notices a difficulty in arriving at consistency.

    I disagree that Fred Picker was only selling timers. In my opinion,from the Zone VI products that I used, they represented departures from existing methods and products and that these departures represented improvements. As such I still consider them representing good value.

  4. #14

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    I have that same Beseler timer( audible/auto-repeating). I had to re-solder several connections on the X10 switch to get it working. It is mounted on the PC board and I guess the connections get stressed over time. It was a simple fix for me because I am a Electronic Technician.

    You may want to have someone good with a soldering iron open the bottom cover and check those connections.

    I believe the difference between several short time exposures Vs 1 total is called the "intermittency effect". It is mentioned in Fred Picker's book. I sometimes have to shorten the total time a bit because it seems darker than what is seen on the test strip and it's series of exposures..

  5. #15

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    I've read it so many times it must be true

    When evaluating test strips I take this into account and deduct an arbitrary amount (usually 1 sec), then deduct a bit more for dry down (usually another 1 sec)... while doing the final test enlargement, I might change my mind again...

    On timers... I used to use a mechanical (Novex) that repeated times (whatever length) accurately, but was not accurate (ie. 10secs on the dial wasn't 10secs, etc) The problem was compounded when you did you test strip at say 3secs and decided you liked the 4th segment... now is that 3x4=12 (ignoring the above factors) or something else... (which it was). I now use a digital (Durst Labotim) and the difference in ease of use is huge. If I print something I've done previously, I'm pretty confident of the exposure times I've recorded in my notes.

    However, if what you're doing now works for you, stick with it.

  6. #16
    lee
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    I disagree that Fred Picker was only selling timers. In my opinion,from the Zone VI products that I used, they represented departures from existing methods and products and that these departures represented improvements. As such I still consider them representing good value.

    I did not say that they were bad products. They were certainly ahead of the time. I still use several zone vi products in my darkroom and in the field.

    lee\c

  7. #17

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    I also have a bit of electronic knowledge ( and perhaps a skill or two ) and have fixed a EPOI time with erratic behavior. There is what is commonly called a RC circuit inside for each time increment.

    Simply put this is a capacitor (10 cent item) and resistor (another 10 cent item) together. Over time the capacitor can be a problem.

    A competent techie at a fix-it store should be able to repair this quite quickly. I am just not sure if the capacitor bank (group of capacitors) would be available. Might be worth having somebody take a quick look and offer an estimate on the repairs.

    Kind Regards,
    Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark. Professionals built the Titanic.

  8. #18

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    Thanks Greywolf & Jhannon, your suggestions sound reasonable except for my electronics illiteracy. As to a "competent techie" I used to know several and I'll have to scare one up for this. If I have to pay for repairs I think I'd rather go Jeremy's way and save for a metrolux.

    I still wonder about changes in contrast as the on/off cycle length will change the color spectrum of the bulbs light which might cause a contrast shift. I'll have to daydream about how to test for this but my guess is that for my purposes it is a non-problem.

  9. #19
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    The x10 switch is the only thing wrong with my beseler. The reason for saving for a metrolux is the ability to save multiple times in memory, I'm thinking this might make it easier to split-print. Then again, I might just save up for the RH Designs timer. Who knows, I don't
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  10. #20
    lee
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    Jeremy,
    As you know I have a Metrolux II timer and if you have any questions please feel free to ask. I have used several timers before and this is by far the best timer I have ever used. Granted I have not used RH Designs set of timers but I have heard that they are excellent. But with the Metrolux II you can buy realatively cheap acc that will allow you to have a small densitometer and a shutter checker. You can get a probe that fits in the head of a cold light that will adjust for voltage fluxuation and if the cold light starts to get to warm. It will make the timer count slower or faster. www.calumetphoto.com

    lee\c

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