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  1. #11
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Depends upon the type of grain focuser. The ones which have a reference line are meant to be operated using the parallax method, not "when the grain looks sharp." I know the old Bausch and Lomb worked that way. I think the Scoponet does (have not used my Scoponet in quite some time and I just don't remember.)
    Positioned as folks have noted above, you focus until the grain looks sharp, whilst you are looking through the center of the focus finder. Then you tilt the head back and forth slightly. If the grain moves in relation to the reference line, you are not quite in focus. Refine focus until there is no displacement when the parallax changes.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    For 35mm I focus on top of the paper using the red safe
    light filter on the enlarger. For the 4x5 I use a throw-away
    piece of paper and no safelight.
    So for 35mm a color is used for which the paper is not
    sensitive and is at the opposite end of the spectrum for
    which the paper is sensitive, blue, and for VC, green as
    well. Well the lens may or may not be all that well
    corrected. That is, blue and also the green may
    focus at other than the red focus.

    Enlarging lenses are for the most part achromates, two
    color corrected. Actually blue is the supplied filter color
    of the more expensive grain focusers. Paper sensitivity
    extends well into the very deep blue and even the
    ultraviolet. That goes for Graded and even more
    so for VC.

    I don't bother with grain focusing. I don't need a forty,
    sixty, eighty, or more diameter enlargement to know
    if my image is in focus. I rely on close viewing with
    reading glasses, both eyes open. Focus with lens
    wide open then stop down. I the image looks
    sharp wide open it's got to be even sharper
    stopped down. Dan

  3. #13
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Too true, Dan. I also read somewhere that (as long as you pretty much use the same thickness paper) you could take a piece of your printing paper and affix it to the bottom of your focuser so that you would have the focuser the proper distance above the easel.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  4. #14
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brickbird View Post
    I was going to ad...Use an old piece of paper to put the focuser on and do not focus on the easel.
    This comes up quite often. However, Gene Nocon, a much better printer than I will ever be, suggests not using paper on the easel. He also advocates the use of a blue filter so that you see the same wavelength of light that the paper is sensitive to.

    This is in his book "Photographic Printing" well worth getting a copy if you can find one.

    However, Amazon lists it new here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Photographic.../dp/1852270152 for £184 which seems a trifle excessive!

    I bought mine for a few pounds at a charity shop.



    Steve.
    Last edited by Steve Smith; 02-16-2009 at 02:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  5. #15
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    I also read somewhere that (as long as you pretty much use the same thickness paper) you could take a piece of your printing paper and affix it to the bottom of your focuser so that you would have the focuser the proper distance above the easel.
    See my post above.

    It is my opinion that the grain focuser manufacturers have already taken the paper thickness into account.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post

    However, Amazon lists it new here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Photographic.../dp/1852270152 for £184 which seems a trifle excessive!

    I bought mine for a few pounds at a charity shop.



    Steve.
    Wow a £184! I have read the book and it's OK but on this basis a new Tim Rudman or Les McLean book must be worth a four figure sum!

    Seriously though, I think it must be due to its being out of print and seen as the original book on f-stop printing a collector's item maybe. Gene mentions the blue filter giving a sharper focus and in the book produces a before and after print to prove the point. It might be the limitation of print reproduction in a book but I looked at both prints long and hard and couldn't distinguish between them.

    Others who have written on the subject and are well regarded in the printing game have expressed similar doubts but "you pays your money etc"

    pentaxuser

  7. #17
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Seriously though, I think it must be due to its being out of print and seen as the original book on f-stop printing a collector's item maybe.
    I will let mine go for a mere £160 if anyone is interested!!!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #18
    RJS
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    The Hocus Focus, distributed by Jobo is extremely inexpensive, simple to use and seems as if it can't be terribly accurate. Testing against my Peak magnifier I can't find a difference in the focus point. It flies in the face of reason that something so simple and inexpensive should be so good.

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