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  1. #11

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    Sean, I just got the Lee compendium shade w. 2 filter slots for xmas, very nice! Highly recommended.

    Regarding filters for this, thru b&h, there's 'polyester' filters that are real cheap,$16, and these 'resin' ones for $70: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...u=87370&is=REG

    What's the difference in these??

    I picked up a seal 200 on ebay in great shape for only $250...great deal. every now and then a good one w/ a buy now pops up w/ a good price. good luck!

    i like the pentax spot myself. i like the dial and the help previsualizing the scene.

    chris

  2. #12
    lee
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    Ya know Sean, you really don't need to buy or build night vision goggles. If you do a test with time and temp controlled and if you find your normal time then you can do a ring around if you insist on this DBI thing. Not saying it is wrong but the guys that use it the most have about 30 years or so of experience. They don't use them (the night vision goggles) Back to the test. Expose a set of negs all the same and then develop them all in the same tray. Lets say our time/temp time for normal development turned out to be 11 minutes so figure out what minus 25% of 11 minutes is (8.25 or so)and pull one neg out at that time and look at it with the green light. Throw that neg in the stop bath. Then at minus 15 % of 11 minutes (9.35) pull another one out and look at it. Into the stop bath. Then at 11 minutes pull another one and look at it. So on until no more negs in the developer. Of course, after 11 minutes we are starting to add time to our 11 so it would be say +15% and then +25%. After the lights can come back on you should see the effects of the minus and plus development. Now if you do that a number of times you will get the hang of DBI and you will start to see what the film looks like under the green light. (It will not look like much of anything for a few times just some off green/white blobs.) And you have not spent time or money on a project that may or may not help you any. That time could be used using the Deardorff and learning about that. This is not rocket science but is something that you have to do past reading and thinking about it. Experience is the very best teacher you can have. It will teach you how to apply what you have read here.

    Go for it!

    lee\c

  3. #13
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    Hello, Sean

    I've been away from home for the new year holidays, and could not reply to your post before.

    You have to solder a few LEDs in a series connection (cathode of one to the anode of the other and so on), place a resistor in series with this string and connect everything to a battery.

    So, it's fairly simple, but we have to know:
    - How many LEDs would be necessary? Maybe do a test with say 3 LEDs and 4 penlite batteries?

    To do that test, pick the highest efficiency LEDs you can find (it means more light) a battery holder for 4 AA batteries and one 56 ohms 1/2w resistor.
    Connect everything in series a stated above (for the test you don't even need a board, do a kludge) connect through wires the cathode side to the negative of the battery and the anode side to the positive, do not forget the resistor.

    By then you will have IR light to do a test.

    Let me know if you have any doubts on the above .

    Jorge O

  4. #14
    Sean's Avatar
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    so far so good. Have had some good luck on ebay. I got a decent spot meter for cheap, and just won a good condition Seal 110s Drymount Press for $200, same unit sells at Calumet for $680 new. I'm getting the material to make some dark curtains and a focusing cloth this weekend.

    Can anyone recommend a good loupe? I am not sure what magnification is best, I typically like a lot of magnification to make sure things are razor sharp. Thanks!

  5. #15
    lee
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    Sean,
    If you get a loupe that is too strong, you will end up seeing the grain of the glass and not the image. And that happens at about 10x. I use a Toyo and it costs about $50 or so dollars. You will have no trouble focusing with something like that. Or you can buy some of those glasses that are used for reading. I used to buy them at Wal-Mart before I bought this Toyo.

    lee\c

  6. #16
    Sean's Avatar
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    Thanks lee, what magnification is your toyo?

  7. #17
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    I agree with Lee. The biggest mistake that people make is thinking that the higher the magnification, the better. I use an old Kodak,4X I believe, that served me well through decades of commercial use.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  8. #18
    lee
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    Thanks lee, what magnification is your toyo?
    Sean,
    I think it is about 4x or just under that. I have had it awhile. I wanted one of the fancier ones but they cost too much and I could not get a deal.

    lee\c

  9. #19

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    I've been using a simple dime-store magnifying glass to focus with for three years. I started out with a loupe, but already had a spotmeter and framing card dangling from my neck and so I used to put the thing in my pocket, where it was too bulky and picked up difficult to clean crud. The magnifying glass works just fine -- and even better in some ways because I can angle it in the corners like a Silvestri loupe. Do I look unprofessional under the darkcloth without a loupe? You BET! ...but who cares, it's DARK under there! Anyway, I keep it, a pocket level, and a pen light in my one back pocket all the time and can always tell which I'm pulling out by its shape.

  10. #20
    bmac's Avatar
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    The Toyo is 3.6 I believe. It is nice because it has rubber ends, so you dont scratch the GG or your eye glasses (If you are 1/2 blind like me)

    Still waiting for an autofocus ULF camera Brian
    hi!

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