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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    60
    I just stopped fretting over it and ordered an Intellifaucet D250 and filter kit... with the low-flow option. What this does is alter the control program so it's more accurate at low flow rates. I guess it reduces the expected temperature change in response to valve adjustments to eliminate self-induced oscillation -- which for higher flow rates means it might take a fraction of a second longer to home in on the temperature.

    Tomorrow I've got to call the plumber for a consultation. I'll definitely want feed valves before the filters so I can service them. I should also check with him if I need vacuum breakers, but I suspect probably not. I can probably break a lock by unscrewing either or both filter canisters. But if they're cheaper than me I might have a set installed anyway.

  2. #12
    DKT
    DKT is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    504
    CLR is just a househould cleaner. calcium-lime-rust remover or something like that. the water in our lab is rather hard--and since the water panels are used every day--they tend to get gunked up . that's what I was alluding to above--this kind of stuff happens. with water-panels and you should plan on having to rebuild them annually....same as changing filters out every month or even more frequently than that. It just depends on how much you use them.

    The Intellifauct has these internal valves that you can pull out & soak in CLR as long as you don't get the PC board wet. It's kind of a PIA, but cheaper than sending it off to the manufacturer, who would do the same thing pretty much (they told us how to do this). Over 5-6 years now I guess, we've done this maybe 3 times. The reason why we went with the Intellifaucet over the Wing Lynch is on a tip from our dealer/tech guy--they handle swings in water pressure better than a WL panel. Our lab is in a large public building and we have all sorts of water pressure problems at various times of the day.

    The vaccum breakers are just for safety more or less when the water panel is permanently plumbed into a processor. the check valves will probably be built into whatever unit you buy--they keep the flow running one way--but these can get gunked up too eventually, so if you buy used, check these out. Some you can get at & fix, others just need to be replaced.

    so, it's great to get these things used dirt cheap, but buyer beware....


    Basically you just need to draw out a little diagram for your plumber--make sure you can get the panel out for maintenance without destroying the whole setup. Same goes for the filter housings--you need to use one each--hot & cold. Plan on maybe having to replace the housings every 5 yrs. We recently had a cold housing form a hairline crack after about 7 yrs and had a nice big puddle in the lab one morning.....

    so think about something like shutoff valves for each water line prior to the whole setup. Have couplings before and after the filters and the water panel. With a vaccum breaker mounted higher than the processor & water panel--between the water panel and the Jobo. You can T off the water panel though. Run one off to the jobo--the other to a sink. No problem. In fact, you might find that you have to run a bit of water continuously to keep it at the right temp for some of the wash steps in E6--otherwise it might take 15-20 seconds for the thing to stabilize and by then you're almost quarter of the way through the wash step. Too hot or too cold--by even a degree or two in the some of the steps will cause you some problems. It wastes a bit of water, but works better this way unless you can set up a recirculating loop somehow.

    Hope this isn't too confusing, if I had more time, I'd try to shoot a couple of snapshots of these panels. It sounds complicated, but if you draw it out, it will make more sense.

    KT

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    60
    Yep, I ordered the filter kit with it; it comes with a 10 micron cold water filter and 5 micron hot water filter. I'll consult with the plumber, but there's no hurry since my D250 isn't expected to ship until Mar 12. It should be a relatively straightforward installation. The gravity drain makes me a little nervious though since there's a washer on the same drain, and it's not gravity! The thing has an outlet pump; if the drain pipe backs up I'm concerned it might back up into the ATL before the washer notices and stops. So I need to have the plumber suggest something, perhaps a one-way valve of some sort. Or a manual valve that can be closed when the washer is in use.

    I'd hate to find my processor blowing bubbles.

  4. #14
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    Roswell, Ga. USA
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    Easiest thing to do would be an open standpipe that the ATL drains into like the washer does to prevent anything backing into the processor. If the plumbing allows it that is. That will prevent any back pressure from getting into the ATL drain lines.
    Gary Beasley

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan Brittenson
    Yep, I ordered the filter kit with it; it comes with a 10 micron cold water filter and 5 micron hot water filter. I'll consult with the plumber, but there's no hurry since my D250 isn't expected to ship until Mar 12. It should be a relatively straightforward installation. The gravity drain makes me a little nervious though since there's a washer on the same drain, and it's not gravity! The thing has an outlet pump; if the drain pipe backs up I'm concerned it might back up into the ATL before the washer notices and stops. So I need to have the plumber suggest something, perhaps a one-way valve of some sort. Or a manual valve that can be closed when the washer is in use.

    I'd hate to find my processor blowing bubbles. :)
    To the best of my knowledge all plumbing codes within the United States will require a trap in the drain line leading to your processor. This will prevent sewer gas from entering habited space. The water in the trap will prevent some back flow resistance to you your washer backing up into the processor. Additionally there is a "flapper type check valve" that is usually installed in the outlet line of a sewage pump. The ones that I have experienced are usually 2 in IPS. They work very well insofar as back flow but they do present some minimal resistance to the gravity flow from your processor.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    60
    I just received the ATL-1, and am quite happy with it. It looks in great shape, well taken care of. Came packaged with two 2830/2840 (16x12) paper drums, a smaller 2800 series paper drum, a 3006 expert drum (4x5/5x7), 2 1520+1530 (1540) film tanks, a single 1520, a 2500 series film tank, about a dozen 120 stainless reels, a few plastic reels, 16 chemistry bottles that look clean, a separate CPE2 heater unit for a holding bath, lots of documentation, and a bunch of random knicknacks like spare light traps, lids, spare fuses, roller bearings/assemblies, etc. Might turn out to be a pretty good deal for the $700 I paid if it works, too. The previous owner said the circulation pump starts out slow but picks up pretty soon as it warms up, but I might want to replace it sometime. It's the regular CPP-2 unit.

    Checking the manual I'm happy to see it actually tempers the rinse water, and the feed only needs to be ballpark. So if it's sat 5-10 minutes in the hose between the mixer and the processor it should still be fine... I might also skip the drain and just use a large bucket for the rinse water, will have to see what the plumber says. The rinse water tempering means I won't have to trickle the feed to keep the water warm.

    I'm excited now!!!

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