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  1. #11

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    In Holland LED's are used in trafic lights aswell and function great.
    If the city decides to lower maintenace rates complaints will follow from the public, however the lights themselves need less replacement and are more reliable.
    Using LED's in the darkroom is a thing I want to experiment with when I get to build my darkroom.

    Peter

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Javins View Post
    Good morning;




    That was more than just changing the light bulbs. We also replaced broken parts, missing screws, tightened mounting hardware that loosens in the wind over months of constant vibration, and other things. That preventive maintenance is now lost. The functional reliability of our traffic signals is now somewhat less.
    Absolutely correct!!

    Having spent the last nine years in the commercial & electrical and lighting industry, I can assure everyone that the unintended consequences of reducing maintenance costs is, by definition, a reduction in maintenance.

    This will eventually be measured and calculated in terms of acceptable deaths per mile driven.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by arigram View Post
    I've read concerns about the disappearance of the old bulb due to the stricter new environmental laws in the EU, US and other countries, which might have an effect in the printing process.

    Do we really need this type of lighting to continue with our printing?
    I read that article and was immediately alarmed because the object is to make the bulbs more efficent. The problem will arise with low output applications like safelights. It is already difficult to find incandecent bulbs at less than 40 watts. Safelights are often 25, 15 or even 7.5 watts, and any increased output would create an un-safelight. It is unlikely that anybody would start making new safelights of any kind. We may all have to go to a Thomas, (not necessarily a bad thing and Fred Thomas is an old and dear friend) but they are quite expensive. They are not "incandescent" (as defined by the law) but Freestyle list the replacement bulb alone for one of those at $109.99. With my tight budget I am always in fear of my ancient Thomas needing a bulb replacement.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred De Van View Post

    We may all have to go to a Thomas, (not necessarily a bad thing and Fred Thomas is an old and dear friend) but they are quite expensive. They are not "incandescent" (as defined by the law) but Freestyle list the replacement bulb alone for one of those at $109.99. With my tight budget I am always in fear of my ancient Thomas needing a bulb replacement.
    Fred,
    you are correct. The lamps in the Thomas Duplex are not incandescent, they are H.I.D. (High Intensity Discharge).
    More specifically, they are Low Pressure Sodium lamps, not to be confused with High Pressure Sodium lamps.

    If you can tell me the wattage, I can put you in contact with a distributor who will sell them to you directly. It's probably an 18 watt or perhaps even a 35 watt. Either way, you should not have to pay more than $40.00-$50.00 for one.

    Or, just Google: 18 watt low pressure sodium lamp.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    ...I would wager that a good percentage of compact fluorescents used today are misused in places like bathrooms, pantries, etc. where bulbs are on and off quickly. (
    You're not married, are you Jim?
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  6. #16
    ann
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    just saw an article in the paper with regard to this issue and it seems that some manufactors are coming up with a bulb that is still tungsen but falls under the new guide line.

    i need to go back and read more carefully.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  7. #17
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    Aren't "cold-light" enlarger heads a form of flourescent bulb?
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  8. #18
    CBG
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    Ummm .. If I get it right, all halogens are incandescent - but a special type of incandescent. Halogens have been commercially mislabeled as not incandescent as a way to make the public understand that they are somewhat different from ordinary incandescents. It's sort of like squares and rectangles. All squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares. All halogens are incandescent, i.e. all rely on a glowing resistive filament, but not all incandescent have the halogen atmosphere that prolongs the life of that filament.

  9. #19
    CBG
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    I'm stocking up in a big way on photo and household bulbs I will need, and sourcing more energy efficient types wherever possible. Some uses just don't seem amenable to high efficiency bulbs.

    Safelights however may be able to go very "green" (pardon the anti-pun). I'm testing "SuperBright" brand LED red bulbs for safelighting. The brightness seems good, but I haven;t tested the fogging yet. So far, just to do other more critical tests, I just stuck the red LEDs behind red safelight filters to be safe.

  10. #20

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    I love these bulbs. I am slowly replacing traditional incandescents with these. More light and less heat in the fixtures. Also, due to the slightly higher operating temperature of the filament, the color temperature is slightly higher (Philips says 2900K vs. 2800-2850K for a typical 100W soft-white light bulb). It seems small, but it seems noticeable to me.

    This is something to keep in mind if you're replacing some other standard-base bulb. With a little more blue in the light, VC papers might shift a bit, so test, test, test...

    I'll gladly buy any high-efficiency incandescent bulb that comes out, as long as they're not playing tricks with emissive coatings on the bulbs that would make the output "spiky".

    --Greg

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