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  1. #21
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Have you tried looking up the lens in question on Camera Eccentric. They have a very good set of catalogues from nearly every lens maker.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  2. #22

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    See this thread for a possible explanation.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum41/8...135-4-5-a.html

  3. #23
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, I checked both resources and none has specific information regarding my lens, though that thread perhaps gives the thread size (aptly enough).
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  4. #24

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    From my experience and those of others I can state that buying an old lens without the correct mounting flange or retaining ring is risky, as the required parts might be difficult or impossible to find 50 or more years after the lens was made.

    Threading standards have changed and old sizes havenít been made in many years.

    While itís possible for a custom machine shop, like S.K.Grimes, to fabricate a mounting flange, itís not practical in most cases. A custom flange would likely cost $160 and take 4 months before itís delivered.

    That can be the case for a relatively modern lens too. For example, the original 240/5.6 and 300/5.6 EL Nikkors require 82 mm x 1.0mm and 100 mm x 1.0 mm mounting flanges respectively. Those are not regularly stocked sizes at S.K.Grimes or anywhere else so far as I know.

    Iíll repeat the warning I gave in the Elgleet lens thread: Given the scarcity of flanges in these older, unusual sizes, itís advisable to buy a lens if, and only if, the proper flange or retaining ring is included.

  5. #25
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    I agree, and the only reason I want to use this lens is because I was given it.

    But, if I can take it into a hardware store and find some nut that will fit, no matter how ghetto it looks, it'll be worth making a lens board.

    If not however, what are some cheap but good 4x5" enlarging lens?
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  6. #26

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    I've heard of people using snap rings. Maybe at an auto parts store? Or o-rings. Or use a piece of wood or plastic and try to thread the lens into it. Downside is it may damage the threads. Or just glue it on the board.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    Any special reason for wanting a Raptar? And I take it you are looking for an "Enlarging Raptar". They also made a "Pro" series.

    I think the standard focal lengths were 135mm and 162mm.

    Not generally regarded as a very good lens - sample-to-sample variation is rather great with Raptars, so test or get return privileges.
    Nicholas,

    Is there a difference in quality between the regular Enlarging Raptar and the "Pro" Enlarging Raptar? A 162mm Pro Enlarging Raptar found its way into my darkroom recently, but my go to lens for 4x5 is a 150mm Rodagon.

    I really like the Rodagons, I have one for each format that I use. However, I've been using a NOS 1947 100mm Enlarging Ektar lately that I got real cheep. I am blown away by the quality of this lens, I may even sell my 105mm Rodagon as I like the Ektar so much. This is saying something as I generally prefer Rodagons over nearly any other enlarging lens.
    When the chips are down,

    The buffalo is empty!!!



  8. #28

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    In the 1950's and early 1960's I remember that the Enlarging Pro Raptar was considered one of the best enlarging lenses available.

  9. #29
    Zathras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by graywolf View Post
    In the 1950's and early 1960's I remember that the Enlarging Pro Raptar was considered one of the best enlarging lenses available.
    Thanks for the reply graywolf. It looks like a very high quality lens. I guess I'll just have to try it and see. It is in beautiful condition. I don't even remember how I got it to begin with, it's on a Beseler board and my big enlargers are D series Omegas. I have an old push-pull D-II from the 1940's and a Chromega D-5XL that was given to me by a friend who told me to come get it or it was going into the garbage.
    When the chips are down,

    The buffalo is empty!!!



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