Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,294   Posts: 1,535,475   Online: 1048
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Trond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Harestua, Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    658
    Images
    74

    How to change aperture on a lens in a recessed lens panel

    I have a EL-Nikkor 80mm 5.6 mounted in a deeply recessed lens panel for my "new" IFF Ampliator enlarger. The lens panel is very narrow and it's impossible to get the fingers in there to change the aperture. The Nikkor is, I suppose, one of the few 80mm small enough to fit in there at all.

    I was thinking about making an aperture changing tool, perhaps some kind of tube that will fit the aperture ring.

    Any suggestions?

    Trond
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails PICT4349.jpg  

  2. #2
    calceman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Oslo
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    88
    Images
    23
    Why not upside down and inside out? That is maybe mounted the wrong way round: the lens should not be in the recessed part, but on top of it.
    Dont see the use of this kind of deeply recessed panel on enlarger.

  3. #3
    Trond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Harestua, Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    658
    Images
    74
    This enlarger uses screw in type lens panels mounted in a turret, and the lens panel can't be mounted any other way. I don't think it would be possible to focus the 80mm on a flat lens panel.

    Trond

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,377
    Images
    88
    It's amazing that the enlarger requires such a deeply recessed board for an 80mm.
    In any case, some flexible tubing that you can push onto the aperture ring when necessary would work, or possiibly shrink tubing used by electricians. In that case, you buy the closest diameter that fits, then it is shrunk to the exact size with heat.
    If you have a good grain focuser, consider setting it at f/11 or so and leave it set.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,504
    Wow that's narrow. Perhaps a outside ring with a descending arm can be attached to the aperture ring. I'm thinking of a small version of a focusing arm one can mount to a Hasselblad lens to aid in focusing.

    http://photo.net/medium-format-photography-forum/00I9b7
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  6. #6
    Trond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Harestua, Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    658
    Images
    74
    Thanks for the suggestions so far. I think the flexible tubing probably is the easiest solution, apart from keeping the lens at f/11. A permanently attached arm sound nice too, I will look into that.

    It's possible that the board is more recessed than necessary, but that's the board I've got. I've never seen similar screw in type boards actually.

    Trond
    Last edited by Trond; 08-07-2009 at 07:23 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Clarified.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Baltimore, MD., USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    230
    Quote Originally Posted by Trond View Post
    This enlarger uses screw in type lens panels mounted in a turret, and the lens panel can't be mounted any other way. I don't think it would be possible to focus the 80mm on a flat lens panel.

    Trond
    Is that not what you are essentially doing here? (in photo)
    I can state with almost certainty that no self respecting engineer would design a collar for an enlarging lens. Your assembly can not be correct.

    Does your cone mount from the narrow end or the wide end?
    Every cone-lens extender I have used mounted to the enlarger at the wide end and the lens mounted to the cone at the narrow end (rear element towards the negative). It was an efficient way of putting some distance between the lens and negative without over-extending the bellows.

    I think your cone is designed to mount a lens in the neighborhood of 360mm, minimizing bellows draw.

    The wide flange of your cone probably fits the same slot as your three lens turret. Use one or the other?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,301
    There was likely an extension ring made for that purpose. Durst supplied Schneider lenses in recessed mounts complete with dedicated extenders that screwed into the front of the lens. They also had a universal fit extender supplied with one lens mounting board extender assembly.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,725
    I'm also suspicious of the assembly. My Philips PCS130 enlarger uses a reversible lens board. It's mounted so that the lens board extends upward/inward for 50mm lenses and downward/outward for 75mm/80mm lenses. (The amount of "dip" is trivial compared to what's in your photo, though.) If your enlarger is the same way, mounting a 50mm lens would require an even more recessed mount, and then the question becomes: Was the designer a sadist or just plain insane?

    My advice: Mount the board in the enlarger as it is and see if you can focus. If you can't, reverse your assembly. Don't worry about the aperture ring until you figure out how it's supposed to be mounted.

  10. #10
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,093
    1) If you must use that mounting board, then turn it around and then when you use it, move the lens further away from the easel to compensate for the mount length. That will give you access to the lens focus and the lens aperture.

    2) Pick up a flat mounting board and avoid the problem.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin