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  1. #11
    Rick A's Avatar
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    A company called United Gilsonite Labratories(UGL) makes a couple of different paint on wall sealers for the express purpose of keeping water and moisture out of basements. I painted their water base (they also have a solvent base) on my walls and it works very well.After that you can use treated furring strips and mildew proof drywall that uses a fiberglass wrapping instead of paper(which invited mold). If you feel you must, then use an addiyional vapor barrier of polyethyline sheeting between the masonry wall and furring. This is not an inexpensive fix, but then is your equiptment cheap and expendable? The newer treated lumber is less toxic than the old copper chromate, arsenic(CCA) treatment, which was very toxic.
    Hopes this helps. Its what I've been using for over fourty years on construction sites.
    Rick

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralnphot View Post
    If you feel you must, then use an addiyional vapor barrier of polyethyline sheeting between the masonry wall and furring. T...............been using for over fourty years on construction sites.
    Rick
    From what I recall reading in Fine Homebuilding and other sources, this method is no longer considered the way to deal with basements.

    Get as much info as you can before you proceed. You may need to address the moister on the outside first. Use a dehumidifier in any case.

    JMHO
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  3. #13
    DAP
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    Hello again,

    I would like to thank everybody for their suggestions (both on the public forum and via private messages). It sounds like mold is more of a concern than any kind of outgassing from treated lumber.

    As far as preventing mold I am planning on re-landcaping my lawn (to drain water away from the foundation), and installing a drainage system in my basement. I just purchased a product called "squidgee" - it is kind of like a gutter system that allows accumulated water in the cinder block walls to escape in a controlled fashion - this should cut down on moist walls. I have also made a personal vow to be better about cleaning out my roof gutters I also have an old dehumidifier in the garage that I will dig out to place in my darkroom. As of right now I'm going to hold off on putting up any drywall and see if these changes keep the wall sweating at bay (if the walls remain dry for a couple of months I'll think about drywalling w/ DensArmor Plus boards and treated lumber furring strips).

    I'll update this thread down the road to let you know how it goes (I suspect that there are others out there with the same problem/concern).

    Thanks all,

    Dana

  4. #14
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    I plan to use a drywall type product call Hardi-backer. It's available in 1/4 or 3/8" thickness and is what I used for my main shower stall in my bathroom. It's better than the wire mesh/cement boards used for most wet areas in bathrooms etc. I handles like drywall, does not crumble like cement board and can even withstand immersion in water without breaking down. It will NOT mold as it has no particles in that that mold needs to grow. If you use this stuff, you will not need to use treated lumber.

    You place the backing boards on top of a normal rubber membrane liner, and paint a PVC sealer on top if you plan to tile over it. The sealer is bright pink when you paint it on, but it's a water based PVC type membrane paint that dries to a blood red. This will seal EVERYTHING out and can be tiled right over. The sealed surface has some give in it so that tiles won't crack if there is some minor expansion or contraction due to humidity in your house. I plan on just putting stainless steel splash board all over my wet area in the darkroom when I build a more permanent darkroom space.
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  5. #15

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    Dana,

    I just came in from doing some painting in the new darkroom. So hear goes.

    1. treated wood most states/counties/cities make you put in treated wood with construction 'fact of life'
    2. do a mold/moisture seal on the wall. If you have mold clean it up and seal up after it. The boat people have a mold/retarder they use on boats, it works.
    3. if you feel you need a barrier?sp use Tyvec/Tyveck/sp then dry wall.
    4. if you have a damp basement. Get a de-humitifier, and a heater.
    5. Not sure what else to say. So back out to paint some more in the darkroom.

    Size 9' 6 x 15' 4 12' sink I need to epoxy/paint

    Jan Pietrzak

  6. #16
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    From what I recall reading in Fine Homebuilding and other sources, this method is no longer considered the way to deal with basements.

    Get as much info as you can before you proceed. You may need to address the moister on the outside first. Use a dehumidifier in any case.

    JMHO
    Some people read about things --The rest of us do them.

  7. #17
    fotch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralnphot View Post
    Some people read about things --The rest of us do them.
    Yes, there are people who act first without thinking.
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  8. #18

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    Make sure that you have no water build up outside of your basement first. Sometimes a larger downspout that will divert the water away from the house is all that is needed. A barrier of gravel about a foot wide will keep also keep the water away from the basement walls. Of course a proper tar membrane on the outside of the basement walls will also do its part. Protect the outside before you do anything on the inside.

    From the rainy West Coast of Canada,

    Marcus

  9. #19

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    I live in the South US (as you can see) and I have freestanding dehumidifier in my basement, which drains to a floor drain. The walls are brick (1920's vintage). I don't have water seepage, but the basement would be rather humid without the dehumidifier.
    I used normal pressure treated 2x4's against the wall and floors, with normal construction studs in between. I used green drywall on the wet side, and normal drywall on the dry side, both painted several coats. This was 20 years ago.
    I noticed after a few years that negs kept in the darkroom formed a fungus of some kind, which took a lot of work to remove. So I keep nothing in the darkroom other than equipment and chems.
    No matter what precautions you take, I would recommend not keeping paper, film, negs, or even the enlarger lenses in the darkroom, unless you really don't have enough space somewhere else.

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