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  1. #1
    DAP
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    Treated lumber in a darkroom - will it cause problems with paper?

    Hi all,

    I am in the process of ripping apart my current darkroom and rebuilding it from scratch. It is located in the basement and the walls are crumbling cinderblock walls that tend to get damp...overall this provides a nice little dungeon effect. I would like to finish the darkroom w/ water+mold resistant drywall and was planning on using treated lumber for the furring strips that sit between the drywall and the basement wall. I want to avoid using regular untreated lumber because I am scared that it will provide a good base for a mold explosion. Does anybody know if the chemicals in treated lumber will have any negative effects on photographic paper that is stored in the darkroom?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    largeformat pat's Avatar
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    G'day,
    They used to use arsenic as a preservative in treated pine. This has stopped in many countries. They use a copper based material now. This will bleach out in water and in soil. Your dry wall would be best if you used a compressed concrete sheeting (fibro) To provide a barrier you could place plastic membrane on the wall before fixing the wall sheets. If you propose to tile this will give you even better isolation. I would recomend painting the walls of the basement with a water proofing membrane as well. I would steer away from tar based, I would look at an epxoy.
    Hope this helps
    Pat

  3. #3
    largeformat pat's Avatar
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    Also I would look around for a cheap fridge to keep the materials stored. This will extend the life of your materials.

  4. #4

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    "Negative effects" - such as solarisation?

  5. #5

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    Do you want to breathe the air from the off-gassing of treated lumber? Think about your health before photo supplies.

    They now make anti-mold drywall.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  6. #6

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    Pressure treated behind drywall or cement board probably wouldn't be a problem. Polyurathane trim cut into strips might be an alternative. A vapor barrier and insulation might be a good idea too.

  7. #7
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    Many methods used in the past have been found to make the problem worse. It would worth your time to research for up to date info on Mold prevention and construction techniques before you proceed.

    An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

    Good Luck.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #8
    lns
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    I had mold in a tiny area within my finished basement walls 5 years ago, caused by a pipe behind drywall that was leaking unseen and thus unbeknownst to everyone. Some forms of mold are toxic; some people are very sensitive to molds; and remediating it properly can be very expensive.

    If the damp cinderblock walls you mentioned are exterior walls, you might want to investigate exterior waterproofing (and/or rebuilding) before you do any interior construction. I would hesitate to drywall over a leaking wall, no matter how "mold-proof" the drywall is supposed to be. If the mold grows inside the wall, believe me, that's a bigger issue.

    -Laura

  9. #9

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    You may want to consider plastic lumber, sold in my area for deck construction. No chemicals. Also, beware of mould growth, as others have suggested. Perhaps a dehumidifier will remedy that. Under the right conditions, mould seems to grow on anything.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinholemaster View Post

    They now make anti-mold drywall.
    "green board" is used in bathrooms &C ...
    but i don't think it is anti mold, just a bit more water resistant
    than traditional sheet rock ...

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