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  1. #11

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    Oh wait, that should be usable for 120 film and for other negatives up to 6cm x 11.5cm and even 9cm x 12cm, because it's a 13.5cm lens.

    Zeiss Ikon's "D" cameras (6x11.5) used a 13.5cm lens. I think the 9x12 cameras, such as the Maximar, Miroflex and others, used either a 13.5cm lens or a 15cm lens as the "normal" optic.

  2. #12

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    The enlager bulbs are no longer made? So if my bulb breaks, what should i do?
    Anyway it seems to be a normal opaque bulb.

  3. #13

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    I have the instruction sheet for Zeiss Ikon's 35mm enlarger -- the Magniphot.

    I believe that the bulb you want is a PH211. You should be able to still buy them. I recall reading that they aren't being made anymore.

    It was very easy to convert the enlarger to fluorescent.

  4. #14

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    Oh, i know why, at least here in Europe, they are out of production because they are not environment-friendly. But i heard that there are similiar bulbs with a different technology inside, not with the incandescent filament anymore.
    But if i should convert the enlarger, i just have to remove the old lightning system, put a new one trough the hole, and isolate it from the outgoing light, right?

  5. #15

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    The ceramic socket is probably original and should be replaced. The wiring should be replaced too, because 70+-year-old wiring could be dangerous if the insulation has dried and cracked.

    I think they stopped making the bulbs, because demand had dropped. It cost them more to make than what they got in sales (no profit). No profit = no product soon.

    You want the instant-on fluorescent bulbs, not those that take 30 seconds or longer to be fully bright.

    This part is very simple. The fluorescent bulbs generate very little heat. Get a piece of translucent plastic and make a small shroud that will sit inside the enlarger head.

    I'll send you some photos to show you what I did with my Magniphot. It works very well, and I've had no problems with uneven coverage.

    Years ago with an Omega enlarger, I once tried a regular light bulb, and the writing that was on the light bulb was also on my print! I then removed the writing, and then while setting up the enlarger, I could now see the filaments in the light bulb.

  6. #16

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    I know that for enlargers must be used only milky-white opaque lamps, for avoiding that.
    Anyway, i would be pleased to receive photos of your magniphot, because i guess it's better to change now wire and lamp... and do not wait until i get shocked...

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