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  1. #21
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    Michael, I don't think this would've worked for the 60 plus feet I needed for three lines under the house to the utility room, at least where I could be sure nothing's leaking.

    Eli

  2. #22

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    Image of water manifold

    Shows water hookups
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p3n08978.jpg  

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Someone is a bit touchy today, aren't we?

    Steve
    It is also bad usage faucet is more correct, lots of people this side of the pond would say faucet, e.g. in Scotland, it is becoming, has become, archic in England.

    Languages do change and lots of people would be confused if you visit as a tourist, and tried to purchase one. We only use 'tap' in an engineering shop in the 'more correct' i.e. older sense.

    I think the quote is 'two people separated by a common language'.

    Noel

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Jarosz View Post
    I use surgical latex type tubing....

    John
    Surgical tubing is great but not if you will be closing off the business end to stop the water for any period of time. That may be unlikely; just be aware that latex is enormously stretchy. Even a thin stream of water will turn the closed-off tube into a big knockwurst and then into a bomb!

    BTW I'm pretty impressed with the erudite responses including John Jarosz'.

  5. #25
    KenM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by haclil View Post
    Surgical tubing is great but not if you will be closing off the business end to stop the water for any period of time. That may be unlikely; just be aware that latex is enormously stretchy. Even a thin stream of water will turn the closed-off tube into a big knockwurst and then into a bomb!

    BTW I'm pretty impressed with the erudite responses including John Jarosz'.
    I use surgical tubing in my darkroom - water exits from the temperature unit, and drops into a PVC pipe, which splits into two pipes, each of which runs along the leading edge of each sink. I have multiple drop points, with a valve at each point, with the tubing coming off of that. I can then access water at multiple points along the sink without going back to the mains....

    But, as is mentioned above, you have to make sure that you don't obstruct the tubing at all. If you do block it off, it will stretch. If you catch it in time, you'll be fine, but you'll create a weak point in the tubing which will be prone to 'expanding', and eventually bursting. Don't ask me how I know this.

    I will say, it's amazing how much stretch latex tubing has in it
    Cheers!

    -klm.

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