Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,693   Posts: 1,548,961   Online: 780
      

View Poll Results: Do you use a Sqeegee on your negs?

Voters
176. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    28 15.91%
  • Somtimes

    14 7.95%
  • No

    130 73.86%
  • A what?

    4 2.27%
Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 72
  1. #51
    alexmacphee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Surrey, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    I wager not one person contributing to this thread who
    looks down on squeegeeing has ever used the eight
    blade squeegee. A whole lot of knocking before
    trying. The eight blade is well engineered. It
    is not cheap. Dan
    I don't squeegee, and my films dry perfectly. This is not knocking before trying. What problem is solved by a squeegee -- even an eight-bladed one -- that I don't have?

    The only one I can think of might be drying time.
    Alex

  2. #52

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by alexmacphee View Post
    I don't squeegee, and my films dry perfectly.
    This is not knocking before trying. What problem
    is solved by a squeegee -- even an eight-bladed
    one -- that I don't have?

    The only one I can think of might be
    drying time.
    Drying time in itself may or may not be a problem.
    If drip dry were the ONLY way to dry film we'd simply
    put up with it. For some a dust proof cabinet, air scrubber,
    or air filtration, will be needed to keep the film clean
    from air born contamination while it dries.

    Another reason which is not at all obvious is the need to
    keep clean water drops on the film surface from drawing
    residual chemistry from the emulsion and leaving it on
    the surface of the film. I mentioned this matter a few
    weeks ago. The problem was water spots.

    The squeegee I use, the eight blade, leaves no drops
    on the surface. At most the very thinest of water film
    remains and those very localized. Dan

  3. #53
    Perry Way's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Luis Obispo, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    825
    Blog Entries
    13
    Images
    118
    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    Drying time in itself may or may not be a problem.
    If drip dry were the ONLY way to dry film we'd simply
    put up with it. For some a dust proof cabinet, air scrubber,
    or air filtration, will be needed to keep the film clean
    from air born contamination while it dries.

    Another reason which is not at all obvious is the need to
    keep clean water drops on the film surface from drawing
    residual chemistry from the emulsion and leaving it on
    the surface of the film. I mentioned this matter a few
    weeks ago. The problem was water spots.

    The squeegee I use, the eight blade, leaves no drops
    on the surface. At most the very thinest of water film
    remains and those very localized. Dan

    There really isn't even an objectively correct answer. This is a subjective thing. No amount of science will support either side. Whether to risk scratching your negatives or whether to risk water spots. Nobody can claim that squeegeeing or not squeegeeing will always work. So.. really arguing about this topic isn't really worthy. It really is quite subjective. Trying to change someone's habits when they are subjectively rooted (as mystical) is like pulling teeth.
    I love the wilderness and I love my trail cameras, all Fuji's! :) GA645, GW690 III, and the X100 which I think is the best trail camera ever invented (to date).

  4. #54
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,675
    Images
    40
    And one's circumstances help determine what methods works best. At the university we have a heated drying cabinet (w/fan). If the cabinet is already warm and the heat set too high (students are always in a hurry), excess photo-flo on the negs might start to dry before having a chance to run off. It is a long way down a roll of 36 exposures!

    I keep the heat turned down...I even removed the dial so the students don't turn it on "Shake and Bake". I usually keep the heat and fan off when I hang negatives in there (usually late at night and I pick them up first thing in the morning...I'm not risking my negs in the hands of the students!)

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  5. #55
    thefizz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Trim, Ireland.
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,047
    Images
    37
    I never squeegee my films with anything. I just hang them to dry in a cabinet and they're fine. I did use a squeegee on the first few films I ever developed but soon regretted it.
    www.thephotoshop.ie
    www.monochromemeath.com

    "you get your mouth off of my finger" Les McLean

  6. #56
    Willie Jan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Best/The Netherlands
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,911
    Images
    49
    why would you wash the film in water to remove all residu thingies, and afterwards put grease from your fingers onto the film????

  7. #57
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,153
    Quote Originally Posted by Willie Jan View Post
    why would you wash the film in water to remove all residu thingies, and afterwards put grease from your fingers onto the film????
    I am with you! It beat the sh*t out of me!

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #58
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,675
    Images
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by Willie Jan View Post
    why would you wash the film in water to remove all residu thingies, and afterwards put grease from your fingers onto the film????
    One's fingers do not produce any oil or grease -- there are no such glands on one's fingers. Any oil on one's fingers is from touching one's face, especially around the nose.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #59
    Willie Jan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Best/The Netherlands
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,911
    Images
    49
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    One's fingers do not produce any oil or grease -- there are no such glands on one's fingers. Any oil on one's fingers is from touching one's face, especially around the nose.

    Vaughn
    first you are going to eat chicken, and afterwards develop your film.
    I always wash my hands with soap before developing, but is everybody doing that???:o

  10. #60
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,153
    Quote Originally Posted by Willie Jan View Post
    first you are going to eat chicken, and afterwards develop your film.
    I always wash my hands with soap before developing, but is everybody doing that???:o
    Only if they do not want the film to catch swine flu.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin