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  1. #11
    Aggie's Avatar
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    In the years I have worked with stainless steel and other metals, I have yet to see where any of the types of stainless steel have reacted with the pickle solutions (acid baths) that are used in ferrous metal work. Straight steel types of metals, will react. Some more than others. The chemistry used in photography is a more gentle version of what the pickle solutions that are used in metal working. Stainless steel is used primarily in non ferrous work to make the tongs (all types of stainless steel used can't remember the number designation or whether oil hardened or water hardened versions off the top of my head, for all of them) that are used to pull metals out of the pickle baths. This specifically since they do not react with the acids used for pickles (forms of sulphuric acid) as for the basic solutions used in photography, they have no effect either.

  2. #12

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    I am not wanting to be contentious here but I reiterate that not all forms of stainless steel are suitable for photoprocessing. Type 316 is the type that is usually specified. I have spent over 30 years involved with stainless steel, it's various types and compositions.

    Pickling solutions are not the only corrosive substances that are encountered.

  3. #13
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    Bob Coogan head of the metals department Tennesse Tech university based at their Appalacian art and craft center. over 40 years experience with ferrous and non ferrous work. 828-253-8499

    Jack and Marilyn daSilva (she is the head of the metals department CA. College of Arts and Crafts) He teaches blacksmithing and metalworking in of all things SS. Each over 40 years of metal working. She can be reached at 510-594 3600

    Fernando Hernandez only 20 years of welding ss and such Prof at both Cal state hayward and DVC

    Ole Laursen Over 50 years of direct working welding and fabricating with ss, in a non arts related field. Vancouver BC Canada. Wait he souldn't count I just talked to him.. well darn he is my great uncle.
    Non Digital Diva

  4. #14
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    I bought two of the welding rod canisters at lunch today. One by Rod Guard and the other by Lincoln Electronics. The Rod Guard one is a marine blue and just barely not light tight. The Lincoln E. one is red and is def not light tight. I checked by taking the cap off and putting the canister end up to my eye in noon sunlight. With the blue one, you could barely see light transmitted, while the red one let a lot of light through. They could be used as is in a light tight darkroom, or you would have to coat them with something that doesn't transmit light, to use them with the lights on. I will be trying the former method this evening and will post my results.

    Oh and the ones I got are not lined with SS. :-)
    RL Foley

  5. #15
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    As far as the lining is concerned it is not stainless steel it is aluminum. And it is inserted into the base of the tube and not the screw off lid. I would remove it as I did on mine as chemicals would seep in behind and it also shortens the diameter of the tube making it borderline for an 8/10 sheet of film. As far as light tight, no they are not at all. As far as coatings go there are different ways to approach this(this is my field of expertise). A good washing AND scrubbing with a stiff bristled brush using a detergent or TSP and a good rinse to follow. This will get the hand oils and grunge off from sitting in a welding supply house. A good wiping down with a WET rag of laquer thinner will take off any other oils/residues and etch the plastic. Then a good quality spray paint(I like Krylon) two coats will make the tube light tight. Sounds like allot of work on paper but an hour start to finish will due. As far as durability goes we are putting them in a tray of water so there is not allot of wear. Now when there is more than one tube in the water tray they will touch so the paint will need to cure down a bit to get hard hard. This will take a little time and till it does I would be gentle when using more than one at a time. I also groung off the little tab on the screw off lid on top so it sits flush on my counter. As far as the light tight thing goes they transmitted light from outside but they may be fine under a safelight if you didn't want to paint them. I also taped off the threads from getting paint on them.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikepry
    As far as the lining is concerned it is not stainless steel it is aluminum. And it is inserted into the base of the tube and not the screw off lid. I would remove it as I did on mine as chemicals would seep in behind and it also shortens the diameter of the tube making it borderline for an 8/10 sheet of film. As far as light tight, no they are not at all. As far as coatings go there are different ways to approach this(this is my field of expertise). A good washing AND scrubbing with a stiff bristled brush using a detergent or TSP and a good rinse to follow. This will get the hand oils and grunge off from sitting in a welding supply house. A good wiping down with a WET rag of laquer thinner will take off any other oils/residues and etch the plastic. Then a good quality spray paint(I like Krylon) two coats will make the tube light tight. Sounds like allot of work on paper but an hour start to finish will due. As far as durability goes we are putting them in a tray of water so there is not allot of wear. Now when there is more than one tube in the water tray they will touch so the paint will need to cure down a bit to get hard hard. This will take a little time and till it does I would be gentle when using more than one at a time. I also groung off the little tab on the screw off lid on top so it sits flush on my counter. As far as the light tight thing goes they transmitted light from outside but they may be fine under a safelight if you didn't want to paint them. I also taped off the threads from getting paint on them.
    Mike,

    Thanks for your update. Insofar as film under a safelight is concerned, the only true safelight is "no light". I used a dark green safelight when DBI but that was only for a few seconds when the film is nearing complete development. It may keep from fogging film if these are used in a dark room only. Good luck.

  7. #17
    Silverpixels5's Avatar
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    I think mike may have been refering to using the light after the film is in the tubes. While they will transmit bright light (sunlight and probably bright tugsten), I seroiusly doubt that the light from the safelight would be able to transmit through the tube wall. But again the only way to be sure is to try it out....lol. :-)
    RL Foley

  8. #18
    mikepry's Avatar
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    I did in fact mean safelight after the film has been loaded into the tubes.

    Mike

  9. #19
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    Yet one more additional sidenote........
    When getting the spray paint the Krylon paint to look for is called "Fusion" as it is made to bond to plastic.

  10. #20
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    Mike:

    Thanks for the addtional info, and all your help thus far. I believe you saved me a nice amount of money and time.
    RL Foley

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