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  1. #1
    mikepry's Avatar
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    While going down the tube road with many bumps I stumbled onto a nifty setup. While at the shop I looked over at the welding cart yesterday and saw a blue tube that holds the various welding rods. The light bulb went on. This little gizmo is absolutely perfect for 8X10. I went to a welding supply store(even Home Depot has them) and bought two of them. They are called "Rod Gaurd" They cost me 11.00 each. Get the 14" size. All I had to do was wash them good with a little laquer thinner(on the outside) and two coats of Krylon semi-matte black spray paint and voila! I like them for they are threaded and the cap will hold about 300ml. really good rubber gasket and no leaks at all. No need to pre wet, just put film in dry and have presoak water in cap and away you go. They have these indents so to speak running length wise that allows plenty of water to get in behind the film. I do like the tubes in water SPINNING and BOBBING for I think you can't get a more evenly developed neg. I have posted two pictures before and after painting in my personal gallery so check it out if at all interested. The other feature I like about them floating in water is maintaining the right temp. I use ABS tubes with end caps for my 5/7 work and was going to go with that for 8/10 but it's so big and heavy. These little tubes are very light and float very fine. Plus the threaded cap is very convienient. Hope this helps someone.

    Regards,
    Mike Pry

  2. #2
    Silverpixels5's Avatar
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    Wonderful discovery! I was about to build some of these tubes with ABS as well, but this will make my job a lot easier! Thanks for sharing with everyone!
    RL Foley

  3. #3

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    Great idea, Mike, Thanks for sharing...Now if I had just not built my tubes already...Oh well, "a day late and a dollar short".

  4. #4
    mikepry's Avatar
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    As a side note these tubes come in 36" lengths as well and I reckon they could be cut down at the bottom of the tube and epoxied back together for the length someone would need for larger sheet film. I am convinced beyond a doubt after much testing that this gives me the most even, consistent negs I have ever been able to produce(tubes spinning and bobbing in temperature controlled water). Maybe if someone is industrious they could contact the maker and have a run done with black plastic? Would there be enough of a demand?

    Mike

  5. #5

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    Mike,

    As a side note, since you mention color, is this material naturally light tight? Or do you paint them in order to obtain the light tight nature? How well will the paint adhere over an extended period if this is what you are doing?

    I agree that tube processing does have some nice attributes. The thing that I like is that I can process a number of sheets of film at the same time. I got even development with brush development but my efforts were for one sheet at a time.

  6. #6
    Silverpixels5's Avatar
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    Mike:

    Are the tubes you purchased steel lined? I looked up the 'Rod Guards' on the internet and the ones I found were. If so, I would think that if the plastic wasn't totally light tight, then the steel lining should certainly be. Did you do a trial run with a tube that had not been painted yet and found that it wasn't light tight? Thanks for any helpful info you can offer.
    RL Foley

  7. #7
    Silverpixels5's Avatar
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    Their product information sheet says that they are made of high-impact polyethlyene. Does anyone know if this is light tight? Guess I could find out the hard way when I buy some. :-)
    RL Foley

  8. #8
    Aggie's Avatar
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    If it is stainless steel lined it would be ok with the chemistry we use, but if it is regular steel, the chemistry we use will corrode the metal and leech metals into your solution. This may or may not cause a problem. but it is a concern long term. The longer it has been used the worse the problem becomes. I would opt for non steel lined tubes.
    Non Digital Diva

  9. #9

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    This is by way of information only. There are several types of stainless steel. Not all of them are suitable for photochemistry.

  10. #10
    Silverpixels5's Avatar
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    I'm going to go by my local welding supply store at lunch today and I'll see if they have them. If so, I'll develop some negatives this evening to see how light tight they are.
    RL Foley

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