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  1. #1

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    Long exposure time for printing

    Ok, second question for today (and this is a dumb one )

    I did a few test prints a few days ago with my Beseler 23CII enlarger. The exposure times were rather long, like about 7 minutes. I was quick to blame the long exposure time on the bulb (which I think is a 75 watt*). I then thought about it for a while and remembered my Dektol, which had been stored in a fridge in 5ooml water bottles was getting pretty old, about three months I think.

    Then I realized I didnt check the temperature of the developer. I just took it from the fridge and poured it in the tray and added the apropriate amount of water (1bottle of Dektol : 2 bottles of filtered water from the sink).

    Could the old developer and cold developer temperature cause me to expose the paper longer or could it be that a 75 watt bulb is too weak? Both perhaps?


    *I'm guessing that it's a 75 watt bulb because I read on a different photography website that a 75 watt bulb was the "standard" wattage for the Beseler 23CII. when I googled the model number of the bulb that I read about, the bulb in the picture looked just liked the one I have*


    BTW, I still have two 500ml bottles of Dektol, so I'm planning on getting the developer to 68 degrees and trying again
    "The mind that will not admit it has something more to learn tomorrow is in danger of stagnating"

  2. #2
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Why do you store your developer in the fridge?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #3

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    A 7 minute exposure is excessive, unless you were stopped all the way down, and even then, 7 minutes is probably long.
    How long did the print require in the developer?
    And, as Ralph said, why do you keep your developer in the fridge?

    Getting it to 68 before use is a good idea. Completely fresh developer (at 68 or greater) is an even better one.

  4. #4
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Yeah, get the processing temp up. And I agree with both Ralph (in the fridge?) and Barry (7 minutes?). Keep it warm and sealed, takes less finickin' later. And trying opening up to about f/11 or f/8 on your enlarger lens. I doubt you'll be blaming the bulb for much longer.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  5. #5

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    I assumed keeping it in the fridge would make it last longer. Perhaps I'm wrong, which is probably the case. It's not the fridge where I keep the food, though. It's one of those small square fridges, probably designed for college students. I keep my film in the freezer section (a little square compartment in the top left corner); my paper and Rodinal in the fridge part; and my Dektol on the door where the water bottles go. I use the powder Arista odorless fixer and Arista stop bath, but they stay on top of the fridge because there's not enough room inside, and they shouldn't go bad before I get a chance to use them up.

    Also, I develop my paper for 2 minutes. I cant remember if the pack of Dektol powder said 2 minutes should be adequate or the instruction sheet included in the paper. The paper is Slavich Unibrom.

    Before switching to Slavich Unibrom, I used an Arista RC paper, but I'm not sure which. Arista EDU, I believe. When I used the Arista paper, the exposure times were between 20 and 30 seconds. When I printed Slavich at school, the exposure times were about 75 seconds (using a Beseler 23C like the one I have). Could Slavich Unibrom paper be a slower paper? If warmer developer doesnt work, perhaps a faster FB paper would work better for me :/
    "The mind that will not admit it has something more to learn tomorrow is in danger of stagnating"

  6. #6

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    The Slavich is slow, but even a slow paper shouldn't be 7 minutes slow. Did you print with the Arista on this enlarger?
    2 minutes is about right for Dektol, I'm surprised chilled developer that old did that well, or perhaps it was the 7 minute exposure.
    It would be good to make sure there is nothing in the light path that isn't supposed to be there, and that you have the condensers in the right place.
    Also, check the contacts in the bulb socket and make sure there are no loose connections. If your enlarger is the same as what you have at school, there is no particular reason your exposures should be that far off, if you're using good chemistry.

  7. #7
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WGibsonPhotography View Post
    I assumed keeping it in the fridge would make it last longer. Perhaps I'm wrong, which is probably the case. It's not the fridge where I keep the food, though. It's one of those small square fridges, probably designed for college students. I keep my film in the freezer section (a little square compartment in the top left corner); my paper and Rodinal in the fridge part; and my Dektol on the door where the water bottles go. I use the powder Arista odorless fixer and Arista stop bath, but they stay on top of the fridge because there's not enough room inside, and they shouldn't go bad before I get a chance to use them up.

    Also, I develop my paper for 2 minutes. I cant remember if the pack of Dektol powder said 2 minutes should be adequate or the instruction sheet included in the paper. The paper is Slavich Unibrom.

    Before switching to Slavich Unibrom, I used an Arista RC paper, but I'm not sure which. Arista EDU, I believe. When I used the Arista paper, the exposure times were between 20 and 30 seconds. When I printed Slavich at school, the exposure times were about 75 seconds (using a Beseler 23C like the one I have). Could Slavich Unibrom paper be a slower paper? If warmer developer doesnt work, perhaps a faster FB paper would work better for me :/

    Some processing chemicals can be ruined by temperatures below 50°F. Make sure they are bottled up, have as little air as possible in them and keep them at room temperature. Use for fridge for film and paper. There is no need (and possibly harm) in keeping photographic chemicals in the fridge.

    However, I think your issue was more a temperature issue than ruined chemicals.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #8
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    There are three things involved here.

    Light and Enlarger. Power, light source, enlarger type, enlarger height. What is the same and what is different? (check for obstructions)

    Paper. New, old, paper type, manufacturer. What is the same and what is different?

    Chemistry and Process. Type, temp, dilution, time. What is the same and what is different?
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Some processing chemicals can be ruined by temperatures below 50°F. Make sure they are bottled up, have as little air as possible in them and keep them at room temperature. Use for fridge for film and paper. There is no need (and possibly harm) in keeping photographic chemicals in the fridge.

    However, I think your issue was more a temperature issue than ruined chemicals.
    I was unaware that the chemicals could be ruined by keeping them too cold. I assumed they should be treated like film and paper and kept as cool as possible. Since it's getting old and I only have a liter left, I'll order more on my next freestlye order and get rid of the old stuff. I'll go ahead and take my rodinal out of the fridge and put it up on top with my fixer and stop bath.
    "The mind that will not admit it has something more to learn tomorrow is in danger of stagnating"

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    Yeah, get the processing temp up. And I agree with both Ralph (in the fridge?) and Barry (7 minutes?). Keep it warm and sealed, takes less finickin' later. And trying opening up to about f/11 or f/8 on your enlarger lens. I doubt you'll be blaming the bulb for much longer.
    ****** All what others said. In addition, did you perhaps leave a VC filter/filter pack in place with graded paper?
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

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