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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Newtown, PA USA
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    I think the 2nd exit is a little overrated. How many bathrooms have you been in with two exits? For that matter, how many rooms in a house really have 2 exits? Even bedrooms, if they are on a 2nd or 3rd story, effectively only have "one" exit short of jumping out a window. Unless you are planning on using a heavy fire door, a standard interior door would offer little resistance even in a worse case scenario if you had to smash your way through it.

    On the topic of doors, you may want to have it open the other direction so you do not have to walk "past" the door then double back to go in, since chances are most of the time you will be approaching from the other direction. By other direction I don't mean into the darkroom, I mean doorknob on the right so it opens to your left as you are facing it from the outside.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    near London
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    Medium Format
    Posts
    32
    The door is the other way around, (I got it wrong on the picture) it does open out, with the hinges on the right as you look from inside the darkroom. I left an area within the studs with no cables and no cross joists. I scored the plasterboard from the joist side with a stanley knife. I thought,it costs nothing, doesn't effect counter space. I'm sure I could be through it in a few minutes if I ever needed to. I'll make sure I leave a stanley, and a small hatchet in the cupboard next to it...

    I lined it with a polystyrene veneer yesterday, then covered it with lining paper. Going to paint this week and finish off the electrics..

    I plan to paint the whole place white, and then add a small sheet of peg board behind each enlarger, (painted black) to mount all the tools for the enlarger, ie masks, lens mounts,dodging tools etc everything to hand. my main enlarger is a Durst ac 1200. When I bought it I cleared out the guys darkroom, filled my car to the gunnels. I've been using a nova slot processor in my temp darkroom and found it very good. Another item I got when is a Jobo Printlab 3504. He showed me it working when I picked the stuff up. Looks a good bit of kit, dry to dry with 70 secs and self-cleaning. Has anyone any experience of these processors? are they any good ? or are they a compromise for production purposes. Also got a CPP2 with only one drum, boxes of spotting inks and more trays than you can shake a stick at.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Scarsdale, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    71
    I built a 6'+ X 9'+ darkroom (about 20 years ago) by walling off the end of a room in my basement. It took a lot of planning to create an efficient and comfortable space; it was the end of a room that also contained a sometimes woodworking shop, so dust control was an issue. Building the cabinets and counters with the shop right there however, was great. Don't forget to add the things that make it comfortable to work/stay in: proper ventilation, music, a cushioned pad on the floor, etc. Also make sure that an appropriate fire extinguisher is handy.
    On thing that I had to consider, was wiring through a separate panel so that the surge from a furnace or pump coming on didn't affect the power in the darkroom.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Almonte, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    384
    Images
    48
    The most important thing is to plan on where you can put a small fridge in for snacks and frostys.

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