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Thread: Cutting mattes

  1. #11

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    i have a logan and it's easy to use. highly recomended. redimat sells high quality blank mats for you to cut.

  2. #12
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowzart View Post
    Cutting: I learned to cut mattes with a Dexter when I worked in a color lab back in the 1960's. Professional framers laugh when I tell them that, but the fact is, you actually can cut good mattes with it, as unlikely as it seems. Subsequently, I bit the bullet and bought a second hand C&H professional cutter. It's great, but I still mess up now and then, and with good museum board, that's distressing.

    I attended a framing workshop many years ago by a guy who was the curator of a major print collection. He claimed if we went behind the scenes at places like the Phildelphia Museum of Art, we would see T-squares and Dexter cutters being used to cut mats. I think if I had a better workspace, work surface, and a stiffer straightedge, I could do better than I do with the Dexter. But the mid-range Logans look like they might be the best answer for those like me who don't practice once a week!

  3. #13
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    I use a Logan Model #750 Simplex Plus which I'm happy with. I have used the 750 to cut hundreds of mats over the years. When I'm not sure I use a cad program and draw the mat to make sure I get the proportions right. Doing a full size drawing on graph paper as mentioned above is probably even better except I don't have any graph paper big enough. With the cost of mat board a little planning is well worth it.

    Roger

    Roger

  4. #14
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    One very quick and easy way of centering the print side to side if you are dry mounting with the margins trimmed off
    I suppose this is drifting into Presentation, but still relevant to Equipment.

    I don't know anything about dry mounting. Never seen it done. I understand that it's when you have a special tissue, and you sandwich it between the print and the back matteboard, and then you take some kind of special press and heat it up, so it's like glued to the backboard. I don't have the budget or space, most of all, for any large pieces of equipment, so I was planning on printing with generous white borders, taping the print by the corners to the back matte, and then putting a custom-cut window over it, leaving some of the white print border showing around the edges of the image. Is it ok to have the matte touch the print, or should I space it up a bit?

    I previously always just put my prints in albums (or in big piles everywhere), but a family member wants a print and even payed me a small amount for it. It has to be shipped across the country so I wanted to matte it and put it in an inexpensive frame. I will look into getting one of the Dexter-type cutters (I understand it's a hand-cutter) or maybe one of the Logan cutters (sounds like a big piece of equipment to have around).

    I can buy backing material and overmatte material from Michaels?
    f/22 and be there.

  5. #15
    dwdmguy's Avatar
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    I get the back Matte mounting Tissue roughly square and simply use a tack Iron in the Center to have the Tissue, which is the "glue" not move. Then off to the cutting table, or a Matte cutter can be used also, after I trim my photo as I wish, and Square, and again, with the tissue still center stuck to it, measure the Horz Center with a squaring T and then the Vert position I wish, NEVER center but a bit higher, place the photo on the matte accordingly and between two other matte boards press in the Hot press at 150F for not longer then 60 seconds.

  6. #16
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    Hi, if you need to have a frame and mat, consider americanframe.com. They offer a free custom cut mat with each frame ordered. You can order plexi and backing board from them also. I usually just order the "standard" profile metal frame in matte black. For mounting, you can get those clear corner mounts.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  7. #17
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    http://www.adorama.com/LG250.html

    This Logan 250 24" matte cutter looks quite economical for such a cutter. Is the quality good? I'm worrying about it being cheap quality, such that I might be better off just getting a Dexter hand-cutter.
    f/22 and be there.

  8. #18
    dwdmguy's Avatar
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    I would sincerely get a Michaels coupon and grab the 700 Inter + unit. Comes with everything you need plus a DVD.
    She's 42"

  9. #19

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    Logans are POS. Look for a used Fletcher, make sure it has the ball bearing head. Then practice, practice, practice. In my many years as a custom framer I have used them all and Fletchers are the best.

  10. #20
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    The advantage of a 40 to 42" long mat board cutter is being able to easily cut down 32"x40" matboard, which can be economic if one cuts a lot of mats. Also it gives one the option to cut larger mats...for example, I mount 16x20 prints on 24x28 mats.

    My system is actually a hand-Logan and a 40" heavy straight edge -- and a few of those orange-handled clamps from the hardware store.

    I started off using a Dexter -- and still use it for straight cuts (cutting boards down to size.) For the angle cuts, the Logan is much easier to use and always gives you a nice 45 degree angle (the Dexter is steeper). Logan also makes a straight cutter that works great for cutting matboard down to size.

    The window can come over and cover part of the image, though I prefer not to do so. Just a personal preference -- I like the have the print itself define its own edges -- not the mat board window. One possible problem when taping all four corners is that the print will shrink and swell depending on the moisture content -- causing the print to ripple. So one can just tape the upper corners, or use "T" taping -- where one puts two pieces of tape on the back of the print that stick up past the print -- then use another piece of tape to hold each of the first two pieces of tape to the mat board

    One can also use photo corners that hold all the corners of the print and the tape is placed on the photo corners rather than the print -- allowing the print to change dimensions freely. (Pre-made photo corners with adhesive already on them can be bought, too. -- I make my own...very easy).

    Bowzart -- the 1/2 inch "rule", as I stated, is just a general guide, useful for the average size print/mat...8x10 on 11x14 up to 16x20 on 24x28. It will give the appearance of the print being centered. But you are correct -- what is important is how it looks, not what "rule" one follows.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

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