Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,461   Posts: 1,570,629   Online: 781
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11
    jp80874's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Bath, OH 44210 USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,440
    Images
    6
    Les,

    You might want to look up books by Eric C. Hiscock. He and his wife Susan sailed around the world at least three times in several boats. Wanderer II was a 24 foot wooden boat. Wanderer III was a 30 foot wooden boat. Wanderer IV was a Dutch steel boat, center cockpit, l.o.a. 49.5 feet, l.w.l. 40 feet, beam 12.5, draft 6.25 feet, displacement 20 tons. They supported all this by travel lectures and showing slides. I remember that in the last boat the forward cabin could be converted in port to a darkroom.

    The last book was published 1973. He died on that cruise. She took the boat home, but I do not think she cruised again alone or with another. The last book has four rows of 35mm color slides on the jacket. That book was “Sou’West in Wander IV”, Eric Hiscock.

    Other books in the series are: “Cruising under Sail”, “Voyaging under Sail”, “Beyond the West Horizon”, Around the World in Wanderer III”. I think there were more, but that is what I can find here. EBay, http://www.abebooks.com/ and the local library are possible sources. They are great for arm chair cruising and very informative how to bits and pieces in each chapter. They taught me a lot.

    I had a 24’ cruising sloop for 27 years. The first year we lived in Pittsburgh and kept the boat in downtown Erie with four more years in Ashtabula. Then we moved to Cleveland and kept the boat in Huron with easy access to the islands of western Lake Erie. In Erie that first year (1970) we met a couple passing through to the Caribbean who had built a 45 foot cement cutter. The deck looked like a tennis court. They were beer drinkers from Wisc. The galley sink had three spigots, hot water, cold water and beer from a keg.

    A sad thing to keep in mind is that boats and cars can be restored. Owners cannot. I sold the 24 footer to a fellow who was my age (34) when I bought the boat. He brought along his newly retired father who was five years older than I. After three visits the son bought the boat. His last question was, “The boat is in good shape, nice equipment, lots of spares. You tell stories of all the fun you had. Why are you selling the boat? I said all that stuff that was fun 27 years ago, big waves, high winds, long cruises, hurts now.” He said, “I don’t understand.” Before I could open my mouth his father said, “You will.”

    John Powers

  2. #12
    DeBone 75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bradenton Florida
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    120
    I thank all for the responses. I recently bought a 20 footer. Old, needs work. Have not had it the water yet. Prior to the day I bought it I had never even step on to a sailboat. However this has been a ongoing, building dream. Yes I still need to learn to sail, and yes it will be a major challange, but so are most things werth doing. Again still have 8 years.

    John I shall look for those books. Thank you.

    Some other reallities of life in the North. 4ft of snow on the ground from Dec. 1st to end of March.
    Salted roads. Most thing rust.
    Summer temps 90 + with 100% humidity.
    Tornados
    Lived in Maryland know about mold.
    Lived in Idaho know about heat 105 most days
    Lived in Alaska.
    Any part of the country has its good and bad. All depends on the willing additude. Right now it's willing. It 8 years it may not. I'm not going to wait till then to say ok what shall we do now. May just do the snow bird thing. Live here in Summer there in Winter. But one thing for sure, The cameras will always be with me. It's just a matter will the darkroom will be.
    Leslie D. Wall
    AKA DeBone75

  3. #13
    Dave Pritchard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    266
    De Bone, you do have some perspective. I wonder if you really can make prints in a 20 ft. sailboat. I can believe that cameras can be managed, and that film can be processed in that environment. The image that comes to mind is a 20 foot sailboat, with a Dyer dingy hanging off the back, and that crammed with trays, a Graylab timer, and an Omega enlarger.

    Maybe you plan to tow a ferro-cement barge with your darkroom in it.

    BTW, I once dreamed of buying a Morgan 42 ft motor-cruiser, with actual round port-holes. I was going to live-aboard near Wilmington (Murfreesboro Inlet). Double-planked mahogany (sigh!).

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    S Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    158
    You do have a perspective, but unfortunately you don't have a Florida perspective. I've lived in many places across this country and have experienced all the environmental conditions except Alaska. When I inform you Florida is far different, please believe me. Owning a 20 footer up north and a 45 footer down here can't even remotely be compared. Photography will challenge you here unless you are a photo snowbird. Of course, then you will be screaming in traffic because you will be late to make your location to get the good light. Oh yeah, then you have to cope with all the people who get in the way of your shooting process and compositions. One other thing, forget supplies, bring it all with you. Everything aside, do it on a trial basis first, then see if you have the willingness.

  5. #15
    DeBone 75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bradenton Florida
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    120
    "Owning a 20 footer up north and a 45 footer down here can't even remotely be compared"
    Wasn't trying to. Just stating that I'm just getting started. Also wasn't trying to infer that I want to put a darkroom on a 20ft boat. Just saying thats what I'm learning to sail with. I've been to Florida many times. Half my relatives have lived there at one point or another. Some most of there lives. I've never been through a Hurricane. Can't say I want to, but then I'm shure most anyone in the coastal areas don't want to either. I'm not a nieeve, ( gosh I wish I could spell), person. So getiing back to my original question.
    Leslie D. Wall
    AKA DeBone75

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    S Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    158
    Leslie...

    With the history of relatives having lived down here you would have a real good base from which to pick up a lot of important information about this climate and the effects it has on things. They should be able to confirm the general outline I presented on what you can expect. I don't know if any of them are boaters or photographers but the environmental effects can be seen on just about anything. Keep in mind, people always have different standards about things. I am pretty darned fussy. I don't like equipment that gets beat up, corroded, deteriorated in any way. That means I have to be very careful down here with cameras, lenses, other gear and everything involving a boat. The statements I made are based on that perspective, to maintain things to a quality degree it will require a great deal of maintenance, and costs. Equipment like cameras have to be extremely well cared for and protected here unless they are always indoors in air conditioning with humidity levels 50% or below. Just wanted you to be fully aware of what caring for a large boat is like down here. Even a small boat is constant maintenance. You mentioned hurricanes, you have to be well prepared to deal with one and everything has to be fully insured at all times. Insurance on a boat here is expensive and not easy to get. You need "all casualty" insurance on photo equipment here because homeowners will not cover most photo equipment and you definitely need federal flood coverage.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,243
    Images
    9
    I run a boat repair shop. Believe them when they say constant work.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,934
    Not a bad idea at first, but after a while seems like more trouble than its worth.

    Jeff

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin