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Thread: E6 processor

  1. #1
    joe7's Avatar
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    E6 processor

    hi,newbie here,this will be my first post in this forum..
    i've stop shooting slide film since 2006,but suddenly i feel like want to start back.but,i'm having a problem finding the lab to process the slide in E6,some of my friends sent the film to be cross processed with the C-41 as a solution to this problem,but this will destroy the real colour of the subject photographed.
    Is there any E-6 processor which is still available on the market right now?if yes,i hope that anybody can suggest a few model which is suitable for home user(easy to operate) and the website that still selling it.
    thanks in advance for any suggestions..

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    Hello and welcome to APUG Joe.

    Yes, there are processors that can make life easier when processing E6 films, but it's not strictly a necessity. It can be done with standard tanks, but the tricky part is temperature control. Depending on the chemical kit you'll use, it can be simplified to less than the 6 standard steps. Another APUG member (Tim Walls) has written a guide here. If you're going to use the Kodak kit, this publication has some information. Go to page 3 to see the steps involved and have a look at the temperatures. From some point on, there's no need to be very accurate and the process has quite a lot of tolerance regarding temperatures. People who have done it say that it's doable, although rather tedious. In any case, you'll nedd an accurate thermometer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anon Ymous View Post
    Hello and welcome to APUG Joe.

    Yes, there are processors that can make life easier when processing E6 films, but it's not strictly a necessity. It can be done with standard tanks, but the tricky part is temperature control. Depending on the chemical kit you'll use, it can be simplified to less than the 6 standard steps. Another APUG member (Tim Walls) has written a guide here. If you're going to use the Kodak kit, this publication has some information. Go to page 3 to see the steps involved and have a look at the temperatures. From some point on, there's no need to be very accurate and the process has quite a lot of tolerance regarding temperatures. People who have done it say that it's doable, although rather tedious. In any case, you'll nedd an accurate thermometer.
    can you pls suggest me a website that offer E6 chemical with worldwide postage,as i'm from Malaysia.is the powder based chemical is as good as the liquid based chemical,as my tap water contains chlorine,afraid that the mixture of the powder will not same as the one that comes ready mix...i'm a total noob in developing a film,but would like to learn,if this is not hard to be learnt,i'm willing invest in a darkroom equipment and bid farewell to my digital world,and return back to the world of analogue.

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    I'm afraid I can't offer a source for E6 chemicals, but somebody else might do. To make things simpler, please update your profile, so that anybody can see your location.

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    You can set up a simple open tank E6 hand line. All you need are some 4x5 or 8x10 processing tanks, they can be plastic, hard rubber or stainless. Then you need a large container, like a sink basin that can contain all of the tanks. That large basin needs to hold you tempering water (a temperature controlled water bath). You can set up the water bath with a used heater recirculating unit or a separate pump and a separate thermostat controlled heater. You simply fill your basin with water, get it to the correct temperature, your chemicals in the individual tanks will all then be maintained at that temperature and you are then good to go. It is best to use tanks with floating lids, it helps acheives three things - it prevents oxidation of your chemistry, it helps maintain temperature, it helps prevent chemistry cross contamination from splashing. You can set up a system like this quite inexpensively these days. Everything you need is available used and at very low cost. This hand line system is for use in full darkness, unlike standard roll processing tanks. This system will allow you to do rolls or sheets depending on what hangers and or holders you elect to use for your film. One very important item to have is a color process control thermometer for checking your chemistry temps. The correct temperature is critical. You will have to drain your water bath often as the water will become contaminated from dripped and splashed chemistry. You will also need a accurate process timer like a Gralab 300 or similar. You can find just about anything you need to do this on Ebay. You should also obtain the E6 process technical sheets from Kodak on using the chemistry in a manual set up. You can make the system as fancy as you wish or keep things real simple. You can also use typical roll processing tanks instead of sheet film tanks and use a lifting rod for your reels that slips up through the center of the reels so you can agitate or lift the reels out of the tanks. You can use either a lift rod or basket with the larger sheet tanks. For sheet film you use the appropriate hangers and also a special hanger basket if you have many sheets to deal with. Good luck.

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    thanks for all the replies...is the jobo processor still available right now or is already discontinued?i'm planning to purchase it to develop the film for myself and for my friend that having a problem to find the film processing lab.
    what is the model that is still available,and what is the other brand other than jobo that have the similar product?

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    The Jobo ATL 1500 will do everything for you, but it's not cheap. The Jobo CPE-2 will hold a bath of water at the correct temperature and agitate your drum, all you have to do is fill and dump the chemistry. It's not terribly difficult to process your film in a steel tank in a sink by heating a tub of water to 39 degrees C and pouring in all chemistry tempered and keeping the tank in the water when you're not agitating. If you're concerned about your time, the 3 bath kit works much faster than the Kodak kit. Three bath kits are common from Tetenal and other suppliers. I suggest searching ebay for some chemistry. Overseas chemistry shipping is probably very expensive. Check with local photographic suppliers as well, that is your cheapest bet. I have found the Kodak kit to be cheapest, though you may find a different one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe7 View Post
    is the powder based chemical is as good as the liquid based chemical,as my tap water contains chlorine,afraid that the mixture of the powder will not same as the one that comes ready mix...
    No matter if your chemistry is liquid or powder, you'll still need water. The liquid chemistry is concentrates and will need to be diluted with water before use. Chlorine may or may not be a problem, I don't know. Many municipal water supplies are chlorinated, and the problem is easily overcome. Boiling will drive off the chlorine and most of the dissolved oxygen. Simply leaving the water out in an open container for a day or so will do the same for the chlorine.
    Frank Schifano

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    If you're concerned about your time, the 3 bath kit works much faster than the Kodak kit. Three bath kits are common from Tetenal and other suppliers.
    the 3 bath that you meant is this one?
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...h_Kit_for.html

    this is all the chemical that i need to develop my colour slide film?
    is there any difference between each brand?kodak VS Tetenal in producing a good developed film?
    maybe i'll try to ask my local lab,and deal with them to get a better price for the chemical.
    so,the manual developing for the slide film is possible...i'll learn more from the internet.



 

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