Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,674   Posts: 1,481,878   Online: 1115
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Paul Byrnes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11

    how to use a Zelox enlarge-O-meter?

    Hello all
    I have just come into a lovely old piece of kit - the Zelox enlarger meter - made in Sydney some 40 or more years ago by a family electronics firm (Steven Deratz, apparently now retired). Question is how to use it?
    It has 0-60 wheel at top for 'paper sensitivity', a middle knob that has 5-10-20 choices for timing, presumably seconds, and a VU-type meter at the bottom. A paddle with holes is attached by electrical cord to the unit, for placing on the easel (and it works fine). I realise the key is where you set the knobs - but with Ilford MG papers, where would that be? I'm assuming it was made for graded papers, but can I use it for MG papers?
    Anyone got one and using it? I realise it's a specialised piece of kit but somebody out there must have used one.
    Any help gratefully received.
    PB

  2. #2
    Tony Egan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,108
    Images
    68
    Hi, I had on once and found it to be completely useless! Probably says more about me than the equipment but nothing beats a proper test strip in my opinion and I saved time doing this rather than messing around trying to calibrate this meter for every possible paper, filter etc. etc. In the long run I think mastering production of a print is more satisfying than (trying) to master a tool like this.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Hamilton, Ont, Canada
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    980
    Make prints and figure out the times, then pass your meter, with all darklights out, under middle gray of the projected negative, and white and black. then make notes. You will soon find the speed of your paper.
    Once you have got enough data that way you can use the meter properly. It may be possible to use the Delta black/white readings to indicate grade.
    It might be designed to have a ground glass appearing filter over the probe as a sort of averaging device.
    I agree with Tony, but the fun is in the journey.
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

    Regards
    Bill

  4. #4
    Paul Byrnes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11
    Thanks guys - with 2 mins searching on the net I found Mr Deratz, now enjoying his retirement on the Sunshine Coast north of Brisbane. He was very kind but couldn't really remember how it worked, since he designed and built it about 43 years ago! He did say he probably built about 100 of these - which makes me proud to own one even if I can't figure it out. I understood about half of what you suggest Bill, but will think on it. Not sure what Delta black/white readings are but will google that. The VU meter at the bottom has three sets of figures, corresponding to the speed choices above it - 5,10 or 20 seconds, so you read the amounts based on one of the three lines...which would appear to indicate seconds. He said it uses a cadmium sulphide sensor in the paddle, so it has some memory. Any suggestions on the sequence of how you use it would be appreciated - and yes, I do make test strips, but as Bill says, the fun is in the journey. I just can't help being curious. Thanks for your help so far.

    PB

  5. #5
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,425
    Images
    122
    It sounds very much like the Ilford EM10 meter. If you can find the instructions for that, I think the operation will be similar.

    I have one with the instructions which I could scan for you. Like Tony though, I find test strips easier and quicker.

    EDIT: Instructions for the Ilford meter: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/products/...structions.pdf


    Steve.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,837
    If you can post a picture of the thing may be we can help you figure it out. I do believe that it's not very useful but it would be interesting for find out how it's supposed to be used.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Hamilton, Ont, Canada
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    980
    I meant take a reading in the blackest part of the image and the lightest part of the image and the difference (delta) will be an approximation of the range of contrast of the negative. that info, plus actual enlarger exposure times, will gradually get you the info to use it as predicter of exposure times and possibly of grade.
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Byrnes View Post
    Thanks guys - with 2 mins searching on the net I found Mr Deratz, now enjoying his retirement on the Sunshine Coast north of Brisbane. He was very kind but couldn't really remember how it worked, since he designed and built it about 43 years ago! He did say he probably built about 100 of these - which makes me proud to own one even if I can't figure it out. I understood about half of what you suggest Bill, but will think on it. Not sure what Delta black/white readings are but will google that. The VU meter at the bottom has three sets of figures, corresponding to the speed choices above it - 5,10 or 20 seconds, so you read the amounts based on one of the three lines...which would appear to indicate seconds. He said it uses a cadmium sulphide sensor in the paddle, so it has some memory. Any suggestions on the sequence of how you use it would be appreciated - and yes, I do make test strips, but as Bill says, the fun is in the journey. I just can't help being curious. Thanks for your help so far.

    PB
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

    Regards
    Bill

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Hamilton, Ont, Canada
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    980
    There are only three variables 1 the speed, 2 the fstop, 3 the EI of the paper. Stick with one paper, keep lots of notes and the other variable will be come apparent.
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

    Regards
    Bill

  9. #9
    Paul Byrnes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11

    some pics

    Thanks to all posters - getting closer to the answers. Steve, the Ilford meter is similar but mine doesn't use a green light system. Here are some pics of what the actual thing looks like - might have been helpful earlier but I'm still learning abt how to use APUG (hope this works). Grateful for yr tips so far - and thanks for explaining what delta is Bill. I'm still learning the advanced stuff. .
    PB
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails zelox1.jpg   zelox2.jpg  

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,837
    Looking at the pictures I think this is how you're supposed to use it.
    1. Make a good test print.
    2. Select the range switch that is close to your exposure time of the test print.
    3. Put the probe under the enlarger at the point you want to measure (it could be the shadow, highlight or midtone. it's your choice)
    4. Set the sensitivity knob until the meter read the same time as your exposure time for the good test print.
    5. Put an unknown negative on the enlarger and put the probe at the point where you want to be the same density as the good test print.
    6 Read the time on the meter. This is the exposure time for your new negative. I presume if your new negative is much lighter or darker the test negative you could use the range switch to switch it to different range for better reading.

    That's how I think it should work. I think it's a primitive meter and doesn't take into account of the dynamic range of the negative. It simply tries to reproduce the same density on the print as that of the test print.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin