Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,811   Posts: 1,581,552   Online: 946
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,554
    Images
    15

    Durst head light source

    http://www.jensen-optical.us/lamp_kit.htm

    I saw this for the first time a couple of days ago and have been thinking about it since. I still need a head for my Durst 5x7 and this looked interesting, the only caveat is I would still need a condenser head to hold the light without condensers.

    Has anyone converted their head to one of these light sources? I also noticed that they have a financing program, some down and a monthly payment for a year. They also explain why their light source is better than the Aristo cold light. I don't know I haven't seen or heard comparisons.

    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  2. #2
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,378
    Thats just a bulb and power supply. I suspect one could buy a lifetime supply of standard bulbs for the Durst 5x7 condenser head for that price even though they are no longer made.

    I'd try these three-dollar bulbs (PH213) and see if they are a good replacement or not before considering a $1500 replacement bulb option.

    Or for $1000, how about a 5x7 Durst condenser head, Chromega II 5x7 head and a Ferrante Codelite (?5x7) and they throw in a spare 138 chassis for free

    If I had a 5x7 enlarger and could pick any head, I'd go with a Super Chromega II E.
    Last edited by ic-racer; 11-29-2009 at 11:42 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    303
    Images
    1
    Their explanation of why their light source is better is dubious to say the least. Note that the peak sensitivity of their "Average BW emulsion" is right in the red part of the spectrum where safelights emit light!

    If you want to do a proper comparison find the datasheet for the paper you use and have a look at the sensitivity curve. They typically fall off at or before 600nm...

  4. #4
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,554
    Images
    15
    Remember I don't have anything above the head mounting plate, I do have a Zipper 5x7 negative carrier. If I don't find anything reasonable I'll make a head for it.

    Did you understand how they could get a point light, soft light, cold light, and another I can't remember, from one lighting setup?

    pm request for info sent to the ad you mentioned, I just want a head, no chassis, shipping would be easier to take too. And first on the list is a NuArc so this is second on the want/need list. I have to get going on Carbon Transfer printing soon.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  5. #5
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,554
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by David Grenet View Post
    Their explanation of why their light source is better is dubious to say the least. Note that the peak sensitivity of their "Average BW emulsion" is right in the red part of the spectrum where safelights emit light!

    If you want to do a proper comparison find the datasheet for the paper you use and have a look at the sensitivity curve. They typically fall off at or before 600nm...
    It could be another dead end then.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  6. #6
    resummerfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Alaska
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,298
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    ......Did you understand how they could get a point light, soft light, cold light, and another I can't remember, from one lighting setup?.......
    Mr. Jensen’s product is a tightly-grouped filament bulb placed in a specially designed reflector, and controlled by a variable power source. By changing the diffuser types and their placement, you should be able to achieve a range of diffusion, from point light through cold light. And I think it's been proven that there is no visible difference in a print made with cold light vs. diffused incandescent light.

    About 3 years ago, Donald Miller started a very interesting thread on APUG about point light sources and diffusion, and I think he may be worked on a setup that was very similar to Mr. Jensen’s. Here is a link to that old thread.

    I have a spare Durst condenser head, so a few years ago I looked into Mr. Jensen’s product, or possibly building a setup similar to that described by Mr. Miller. But I decided to avoid an incandescent lamp because it shares a problem with all high-output incandescent lamps—heat. Notice the optional cooling fan in Mr. Jensen’s advert.

    I presently use an Aristo T-12 cold light, and I couldn’t be happier. It is fairly bright, well diffused and, most importantly, very cool. I can print for hours and not appreciably raise the temp in the darkroom.

    But if you don’t mind the heat, then a variable diffusion semi-point source would be very interesting.

  7. #7
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,554
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by resummerfield View Post
    Mr. Jensen’s product is a tightly-grouped filament bulb placed in a specially designed reflector, and controlled by a variable power source. By changing the diffuser types and their placement, you should be able to achieve a range of diffusion, from point light through cold light. And I think it's been proven that there is no visible difference in a print made with cold light vs. diffused incandescent light.

    About 3 years ago, Donald Miller started a very interesting thread on APUG about point light sources and diffusion, and I think he may be worked on a setup that was very similar to Mr. Jensen’s. Here is a link to that old thread.

    I have a spare Durst condenser head, so a few years ago I looked into Mr. Jensen’s product, or possibly building a setup similar to that described by Mr. Miller. But I decided to avoid an incandescent lamp because it shares a problem with all high-output incandescent lamps—heat. Notice the optional cooling fan in Mr. Jensen’s advert.

    I presently use an Aristo T-12 cold light, and I couldn't’t be happier. It is fairly bright, well diffused and, most importantly, very cool. I can print for hours and not appreciably raise the temp in the darkroom.

    But if you don’t mind the heat, then a variable diffusion semi-point source would be very interesting.
    I see, thank you for explaining the concept for the various lighting modes, I know what you mean by heat, the fan he displays as a necessary accessory is four or five hundred as I recall, that's pretty pricey for me. I was ready to get an Aristo but they were bought out and haven't been back in business so I'll try to figure it out.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  8. #8
    resummerfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Alaska
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,298
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    .....the fan he displays as a necessary accessory is four or five hundred as I recall, that's pretty pricey for me. I was ready to get an Aristo but they were bought out and haven't been back in business so I'll try to figure it out.
    When I was thinking about the incandescent source, I was planning to use a simple exhaust fan. I don't remember the exact details, but much cheaper than Mr. Jensen's.... probably way under $100.

    I'm very satisfied with my Aristo, which I bought used for $400. Keep watching the classified ads and Ebay—I see the Aristo T-12 listed occasionally. Or contact the folks that bought Aristo, since they may be able to make-up a unit from parts on hand.

  9. #9
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,378
    My CLS keeps my basement darkroom nice and warm

    Actually, I did test my CLS head vs the Aristo with a temp gun. It takes me about 5 min to process and dry a test strip. So I measured the head just before the next test or final print. Now, the Aristo has a heater to keep it warm between exposures, and the CLS cools off between exposures. It so happens that the hottest part of the CLS is around 41 degrees centigrade and the Aristo is around 38 degrees. Not much difference.

    BTW resummerfield, I discovered how the fan circuit works on the EST2000N. I believe there is a thermistor in the head. I ran a number of short on-off cycles while calibrating the color wheels with a color meter. This heated up the head and finally caused the fan to stay on for a few minutes after an exposure then it shut off once the temp came down. (The fan behavior in the EST1000N service manual is probably a totally different circuit than the EST2000N).

    The Aristo is a LOT quieter. The two fans in the CLS2000 sound like two vacuum cleaners running!

  10. #10
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,554
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    My CLS keeps my basement darkroom nice and warm

    Actually, I did test my CLS head vs the Aristo with a temp gun. It takes me about 5 min to process and dry a test strip. So I measured the head just before the next test or final print. Now, the Aristo has a heater to keep it warm between exposures, and the CLS cools off between exposures. It so happens that the hottest part of the CLS is around 41 degrees centigrade and the Aristo is around 38 degrees. Not much difference.

    BTW resummerfield, I discovered how the fan circuit works on the EST2000N. I believe there is a thermistor in the head. I ran a number of short on-off cycles while calibrating the color wheels with a color meter. This heated up the head and finally caused the fan to stay on for a few minutes after an exposure then it shut off once the temp came down. (The fan behavior in the EST1000N service manual is probably a totally different circuit than the EST2000N).

    The Aristo is a LOT quieter. The two fans in the CLS2000 sound like two vacuum cleaners running!
    ic, you mentioned the Super Chromega II E, what would you offer someone for that model head? Just curious if I'm going to be looking.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin