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  1. #11
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I think a seperate stand for your print washer is a good idea as well. A single large bottom shelf (for structural rigidity) as well as a couple of smaller adjustable shelves for all the large bottles of liquid chems and tray stowage. If possible, fasten to the wall for stability. Also, put 5/16" propeller nuts on the bottom of the legs with short bolts for leveling the unit.

    Rick

  2. #12
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Barry- I have a 6' fiberglass sink in my home darkroom. It is mounted on a square-section tube frame (from the manufacturer) where the tubes are about 1" or so on a side. This by itself is no problem when handling a few trays. However, when I had the 16x20 print washer and the 16x20 Nova slot processor in the sink, the sink started to slump toward the center drain. To compensate, I made a brace that spans the length of the sink. The brace is a pair of two-by-fours running the length of the sink, with a leg at the 1/3 and 2/3 positions, bolted between the lengths. If you want to come by sometime and see the brace, I'd be glad to show you.

  3. #13
    Barry S's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the good ideas. If I build a sturdy table with a framed bottom shelf and a rear frame to support the back of the sink--does that sound reasonable? I could screw in some wood cleats on the sides and front to prevent any shifting. Would it be better to build a shallow trough so the whole sink fits inside--sort of a sink inside a sink?

  4. #14
    Barry S's Avatar
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    Scott-- I was hoping this sink would come with one of those stands, but no such luck. I think the advice to support the full bottom of the sink is good because the plastic is a little flexible and it may see some heavy use. I may take you up on the invite to see your setup.

  5. #15
    Roger Thoms's Avatar
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    This is a quick sketch of the cabinet based sink stand that I built for my last darkroom. It is modular, with "sink cabinet" that rests on two base cabinets. On one side I had drying screens and on the other side a few dividers for storing trays. Shelves would certainly be another option. This can be as basic or a fancy as you want. It could be build out of AC plywood and painted. For mine I used shop grade maple plywood with maple edge banding for the base cabinets, AC plywood with Formica laminate for the sink cabinet. The lower cabinets received 3 good coats of polyurethane. The space between the lower cabinets was for the water supply, drain, and water filters.

    None of this is hard to build and can be done with a Skilsaw if you are willing to clamp a straight edge to the plywood when making your cuts. If you have a table saw that's even better.

    Roger
    Attached Files

  6. #16
    Roger Thoms's Avatar
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    One other note. When I installed the sink in the cabinet I bedded the bottom of the sink in some mortar so that it would be fully supported. So that it would be easy to remove the sink (I was in a rented space) I put down a layer of plastic in the cabinet then the mortar then another layer of plastic. The thin painters plastic works well. Once the mortar set I then caulked around the edge of the sink with silicon sealant.

    Roger

  7. #17
    vdoak's Avatar
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    sink

    My stand for my sink is 1.5" by 2" lumber. This may be a little on the light side but it was built to go into a tight space. I did drill holes into the bottom of the legs to accept stainless steel nuts and bolts. The hole for the nut is just big enough for it and a smaller hole continues deeper for the bolt. This give me the ability to individually adjust the legs so the sink is stable and drains in the right direction. The bracing is plywood and there are slats at about 30 cm intervals under the sink.

    Good luck on yours!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails sink.jpg  

  8. #18

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    It looks like a CPM sink. I know they sell metal stands for these sinks for a couple hundred bucks.

    Try http://cpmdelta1.com/Darkroom.htm

  9. #19
    Keith Pitman's Avatar
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    I had two of these sinks and made stands from a sheet of 3/4" plywood. There are five parts: 1 & 2: The sides are cut to the height you want to the the lip of the sink at the front, and then angling upward at the angle of the sink sides to the back; 3 & 4: Cross pieces about eight inches wide for the front and back; and, 5: a shelf across the bottom. Glue and screw together and paint with a good enamel paint. The sink will drop in.

  10. #20
    Terrence Brennan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neal View Post
    Lumber is cheap. I would support the bottom of the sink.
    I second that idea!

    I made the support for a 8-1/2-foot stainless steel sink from 2x4's, using six legs. It has a leg in each corner, and two in the centre, one front and one back. The corner legs are made from two pieces of 2x4, and the centre ones are a single piece. There are three horizontal supports between the front and back members, equally spaced from left to right.

    For hardware, I used the corner brackets designed for deck building, and they are fastened with #8 and #10 Robertson wood screws. I'm not sure if Robertson screws are available outside of Canada; I believe that they are known as "scrulox" in the U.S. Anyway, avoid slot head screws; use Phillips if you must.

    Support the sink from under the sink bed, NOT the lip!

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