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  1. #1
    Barry S's Avatar
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    Building a darkroom sink stand

    I just got a darkroom sink for a workshop/studio space I'm setting up and I'm trying to figure out how to build a support stand. It's a plastic formed sink with a lip around the edges and I wondering if I should just build a simple table or some kind of frame to support the lip. Any suggestions for the design would be great--thanks.


  2. #2
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    If it was me, I would just get a stack of 2x4s and build a simple supporting sort of box to sit the sink in with stout legs and another frame around the legs half way down to put a shelf on and cover that with ply wood.

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    DanielStone's Avatar
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    put it on 4x4 or 4x6, with 2x4's for bracing support.

    sinks can get REEEEEEAAAAAALLLLLLLYYYYYYY heavy, especially if you have a couple big trays.

    6" bolts should do the trick as main fasteners.

    or, you can just watch your local craigslist, and watch for a sturdy table, or deskt that you can mount this on. you might have to drill a hole for the drain though, when you hook up plumbing

    just leave the thin on the TOP of the table, UNLESS ITS PERMANENT.

    -Dan


  4. #4

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    I agree with building your own stand and suggest you consider a slightly more elaborate design that would permit adjustable shelves under the sink.
    you could also design it so there is some type of support that will permit removable plywood covers for the sink which will add work space when the sink is not in use. Thirty + years ago I built my own sink painted with polyester and made it with the covers I mentioned. Since space was limited that design has been great.

  5. #5
    Rick A's Avatar
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    No need to go THAT heavy duty-I have a 55gal aquarium on a stand made from 2x2 and 1x4, after all, what does a gallon of water weigh. If you design your stand properly, it doesn't use very much wood. I would use six legs, with a 1x4 top band,another band about 6"-8" above floor with a shelf on it. I really dont see you filling it with water, most likely, you'll have trays sitting in it.

    Rick

  6. #6
    Barry S's Avatar
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    The sink itself is surprisingly light weight and I don't envision ever filling it up with water. It fits a maximum of four 16x20 trays, so that would be my limit. I guess the biggest weight variable is whether I'd use my 16x20 Gravity Works print washer in the sink. The washer has got to be 200 pounds when it's full. I might just keep it on a separate cart because I'm not even sure the built in ribs at the bottom of the sink would withstand the pressure. The storage on the bottom would be a good idea, since I'm short on space.

  7. #7

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    Adding to what I mentioned , If you do construct a support make it so a tray or print washer can be outside of the sink and draining into the sink. I can't really tell what the dimensions of the sink are nor what maximum size trays you will use. For archival processing you would need room for five trays (if toning after the wash - six if before). There are "tray stackers" available if needed. I need them when going 16x20.

  8. #8
    billdlv's Avatar
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    Um yeah actually water is pretty heavy, a gallon weighs about 8 pounds. If you have a 16x20 inch tray, say the actual dimensions are 17x21, with 1 inch of water would weigh about 13 pounds.

    2x4s and a frame to hold the plywood top should be adequate.

  9. #9
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    My sink (DIY fibregalss over 3/4" plywood, I made 24 years ago now) sits on a frame of 2x4's. There is a shelf half way up on the underneath that does not come out full depth, so you don't bang your knees. The legs are made of a length so that I don't have to bend at all to work on prints in trays if the trays are at the front of the sink. Under the sink I have racks that hold print drying screens on one side. On the non screen side, the shelf holds 4x5 tanks, and small trays, as well as my magnetic stirrer.

    The floor under the sink holds gallon glass jugs, and other large liquid jugs. Otherwise, liquid solutions sit on 8" deep shelves that attach to rails affixed to the wall behind the sink.

    I wish I had your luck of a sink that is capable of 16x20 trays. When I go that big I go to the tp of the washer and dryer next door in the laundry room.
    my real name, imagine that.

  10. #10

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    Dear Barry,

    Lumber is cheap. I would support the bottom of the sink.

    Neal Wydra

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