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Thread: DIY safelight

  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    If you really want to DIY I posted some instructions on making your own safelight filters in a thread maybe 6 months ago. At one time that's what many people did until companies like Wratten began making good reliable filters, later they were taken over by Kodak.

    Ian

  2. #12
    fotch's Avatar
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    I made a couple of housings out of wood years ago and used red filters. No problems. Just make a wood box, make is large enough so the heat doesn't build up. You could even make a few light tight vents to vent the heat build up although I did not do that.

    I would not use anything larger than a 25watt bulb and would not use a CFL for reasons already stated plus chance of afterglow.

    The ones I made had dimensions of about 1 cubic foot and a 10x12 filter size.
    Worked great, unfortunately, I don't know what happen to them after I moved.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  3. #13
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    I would be worried about the irregular spectral output of fluorescent light sources. Incandescent is more predictable and more towards the red end of the visible spectrum.
    You're right they are irregular, but all we need is what gets through the red filter. I've worked in darkrooms that had flourescent safelights, never a problem. As Lee said you just need to keep the assembly to specs so everything works and is safe.
    Gary Beasley

  4. #14
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas View Post
    You're right they are irregular, but all we need is what gets through the red filter. I've worked in darkrooms that had flourescent safelights, never a problem. As Lee said you just need to keep the assembly to specs so everything works and is safe.
    Here is a test for believers in specifications. Take a red laser pointer or an LED tail lamp from a bike. Check the spec to see what wavelength it emits, usually a very narrow band >630 nm. Now take your favorite photographic paper, and check it's sensitivity limit, usually <580 nm. Now go to the darkroom and shine the laser pointer or the tail lamp onto the paper from different distances for just a few seconds. Should not expose the paper, right? It took only seconds to ruin the paper when I did it.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #15

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    You cannot use the red/amber filter with film.
    There was a green filter that could be used for several seconds halfway through development.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  6. #16
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    If I was going to make a safelight, I would just use LEDs. Oh wait, that's what I did.

    http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2630/...4ea40d5d_b.jpg

    I wouldn't use a CFL for safelights for spectral reasons, enclosure reasons, being too bright reasons, as well as the fact that they turn off and on a lot if you hook them up to your enlarger timer.
    f/22 and be there.

  7. #17
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    You cannot use the red/amber filter with film.
    There was a green filter that could be used for several seconds halfway through development.
    Yes, I think it's called a dark-green, but it is so dark, you cannot see a thing.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #18
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    For the cheapest (most cost-effective) filter buy a sheet of 'ruby-lith'. You can get it at the art-supply store. A 20x30" sheet costs $5. Get/build a box with one side open, paint it white inside, put in a 7 1/2 watt bulb and put the ruby-lith over the open side. You can also use a large tin can instead of a box.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Here is a test for believers in specifications. Take a red laser pointer or an LED tail lamp from a bike. Check the spec to see what wavelength it emits, usually a very narrow band >630 nm. Now take your favorite photographic paper, and check it's sensitivity limit, usually <580 nm. Now go to the darkroom and shine the laser pointer or the tail lamp onto the paper from different distances for just a few seconds. Should not expose the paper, right? It took only seconds to ruin the paper when I did it.
    The light was too intense. If you take a sheet of paper and hold it up against your safelight, it will fog immediately. Intensity is proportional to the square of the distance, and lasers don't lose their intensity the same way as diffuse light does.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  10. #20

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    If you can find that :
    http://picasaweb.google.fr/lh/photo/...eat=directlink
    It can be the best way to obtain a safelight for cheap, no need for any additional filter and it's only about 5€ in France.
    I use 3 of these red bulbs in my darkroom, and it works very well.

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