Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,907   Posts: 1,584,610   Online: 953
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    36

    HP Combi-Plan Developing Tank

    Hi

    I just got my first LF camera (Sinar F1) and I want to choose a processing
    method for B&W sheet films. I saw an interesting unit (see the link) at B&H.

    Does anybody tried this. What do you think about. Is the agitation is by inversion?

    Any advise, tips will be apppreciated.

    Thank you

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Pl...9/N/4294542841

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,565
    Images
    47
    Combi-Plan is a good system. A little fiddly with pouring in solutions, but a good system that you can treat like a reel tank once you get it loaded. (inversion agitation and work in room light) Mine always goves nice uniform development.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  3. #3
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,559
    Images
    3
    I use the Combi Plan tank. I like it, some don't. Some things I have learned using it (which may violate instructions ). When setting the orange guides on top of the slots before loading, I use a rubber band to keep them from popping off during loading, then remove them before putting the ratchet clamp on top. When putting the lid on (I load mine in a dark bag), secure it pretty well, but after removing it from the dark bag, go around the edges, particularly the corners and press the lid to the tank edges as hard as you can. This will virtually eliminate any and leaks or dribbles during inversions.

    Many complain about the fill and empty times, but I have found it really is not a problem, just take them into account. It speeds things up a bit if both "spigots" are on the same side and you fill and empty through the bottom one (instruction violation here, but it works and I have had no problems).
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  4. #4
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    Fill the tank with developer before loading the film.

    Of course, if you are loading the tank in a changing bag in a sandstorm, that isn't convenient.
    At home, or in an hotel room, it is usually fine.

    Side fill: cool idea.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  5. #5
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Stratford-upon-Avon, England
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,413
    I have one & use it to develop my film in it

    IMO it works fine

    As with all things on APUG there are CombiPlan lovers and haters – so be having lit the blue touch paper stand well back and be prepared :rolleyes:

    It is one of the ways of processing 5x4 film - each method has their pros and cons

    As far as I can tell no one method has outstanding advantages over any other, so it is very much a matter of personal choice.

    For:-
    Simple
    Easy to use
    Cheap

    Against
    They are a Pig to Fill (see bellow)
    Leaks

    As they are difficult to fill, I pre-fill mine with 1100cc of dev solution, then in the dark load the cassette with film, when loaded dunk the cassette into the tank, agitate for 30sec and finally pop the lid on.
    If the top is put on properly, it should hardly leak (at least mine doesn’t)
    I then use an inversion agitation method for the remaining time.
    When you invert the tank hold it so the long side (and then sheets of film) is facing you and rotate to the left and right – the chemicals slide past the face of the film sheets.
    Rotating the tank the other way can cause the film to pop out of the retaining groves under the weight of the chemicals sloshing around.
    I rotate about 120deg to the Left and then a similar amount to the Right 6 times each minute
    YMMV

    I then have a series of these food containers in a sort of production line - http://www.lakeland.co.uk/F/product/2378
    I have them pre-filled with Stop / Fix / Wash Water
    The food containers are cheap but are not chemically inert – so don’t mix them up – the Stop Bath container is always the Stop Bath container
    However, with the lid on they are leak proof – so can be inverted if required.

    As I tend to do my film processing in batches, I have several cassettes, so while one batch of film is washing I can be processing another batch.
    Again YMMV

    To wash my film I use one of these - http://www.novadarkroom.com/product/...bo_Washer.html
    I’m not sure if they are available with you
    If not the Ilford wash method would work in one of the food containers.

    Good luck

    Martin

  6. #6
    olleorama's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    526
    Images
    5
    I'm considering this system too (the trays aren't working for me..).

    My 'local' post order outfit has instructions to do the sideways filling on their site:

    Is it really against the instructions?

    They also recommend a 'falling leaf' pattern motion for agitation. Anyone wanna comment on how they agitate theirs?

  7. #7
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,559
    Images
    3
    We have a member who is a rep. for the Combi Plan and felt that neither the filling through the bottom (I believe he suggested this shouldn't be done), nor the rubber bands should be necessary if it were assembled and used properly. I just found that these techniques work for me, make things a bit easier and have no downside to them in terms of the developed negatives.

    P.S. Pic in the previous post is exactly how I fill and empty mine.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    396
    A few tips from more than a decade with the CombiPlan:
    If you start with the film in an empty tank, I would recommend a few minutes of pre-wash, as it "evens out" the beginning of the development phase (just add 20 seconds to the dev-time to compensate for the time it takes for the developer to replace the water in the emulsion).
    Second, choose a developer/dilution which gives you medium to long development times (7-8 minutes or more), which helps in giving you even development.
    These tanks and especially the holders are a bit fuzzy to work with. Make plenty of dry practice runs, first in light and then in the dark. See to that you have 6 blank or ruined sheets to practice with.

    When done with the developing step, i.e. when you're about to pour in the stop bath, you can be pretty bold. There are two videos on youtube which shows how to develop with BTZS tubes. In the first video, when the development phase is done, Fred Picker (?) simply screws the cap of and puts the tube in a tray filled with stop bath. This is done in full white light. Once I saw the older version of the instructions, I tried it with my CombiPlan like this:
    Develop like normal, but when there's 30 seconds left, I have only a red light on in the other end of the room. I then lift one corner of the lid and pour out the developer (in a jug or in the sink, depending on if I will reuse the developer or not). When the timer rings, I lift the corner a bit more and pour in the stop bath, after which I put the lid back and agitate for some 30 seconds. I then pour out the stop bath and pour in the fixer. The film is now definitely light-proof and I can take the lid off and agitate by lifting/dropping the film holder until done.
    I know that this may sound controversial, but it's safe and saves you both time and effort.

    //Björn

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tucson
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    237
    Quote Originally Posted by edtbjon View Post
    These tanks and especially the holders are a bit fuzzy to work with. Make plenty of dry practice runs, first in light and then in the dark. See to that you have 6 blank or ruined sheets to practice with.

    //Björn
    I'm a bit of a klutz in the dark, but I found them quite easy to load. For what its worth.

  10. #10
    mightyomega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    New York
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    30
    I've had one for quite a long time. I like it, even if it is a bit fiddly sometimes.
    I've been using it with Diafine lately, so the fill time doesn't really matter. Previously, I've been using it with high dilution Rodinal with relatively long development times (10-15 minutes), so the long fill/drain time (about 30 s) hasn't seemed to make a difference. I do put the fill and drain on the same side.
    It has been my experience that you really do need to assemble it carefully lest the film slip out of the slots. Also, the lid does need quite a bit of pounding to get it on tight, lest it leak a bit.
    Is it perfect? No, but it's been the only daylight 4x5 option that hasn't annoyed me badly.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin