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Thread: Tank and Reel

  1. #11

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    If leak is a concern, get a stainless steel tank with plastic top. They fit snuggly and no leaks. Most of my stainless steel ones leak JUST A LITTLE. Not enough to be a problem though.

    This is one of the area if you ask enough people, you'll see a good split of opinions. The bottom line is, use what works for you. (which you wouldn't know without trying both....) There are strong opinions on both sides and there are pros and cons. You won't find "the best" unless you try yourself.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #12

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    A good thing about plastic reels is that they're adjustable, which means that you use the same reels for 135 and 120 film. No need to buy extra reels for different formats.

  3. #13

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    I've used plastic and steel. I went with steel & haven't used a plastic reel in over thirty years.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  4. #14
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    I use them both. I'm goofy!

    The stainless loads from the center out while the plastic loads from the outside into the center. I've got the Paterson system where I can develop multiple reels at the same time while the stainless can I have accommodates 1 reel at a time. Just what I've got.

    They both work very well. The stainless can I can put into a tub of water to maintain temperature and I find the stainless transfers heat/cold quicker than plastic. I find the liquid pours in faster & drains faster with the Paterson tanks. They use an upside down funnel for the lid!

    So it's the same horse just a different color!

    Your choice.
    Bill Clark

  5. #15
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TareqPhoto View Post
    Hey all,

    I have few questions:

    1. Which one is recommended, the plastic tank or the steel tank?
    ********
    Yes.

    2. Which is better, plastic reel or stainless steel reel?
    ********
    Yes

    3. Is it better to go with a tank that hold one 120 reel or 2-x reels? so can i develop one reel in a two-120-reels tank or it is better to develop one reel in a tank which hold 1 reel?
    ******
    Given a choice, I prefer a larger tank with fewer rolls of film than maxiumum. I fill the tank with emty reels so the film does not slosh up and down. I fill the tank with chemistry so I use more chemistry than necessary. But, since I replenish and re-use my film developer, there is no waste.

    Also, I am not being snotty with the answers to questions one and two. Both ss and plastic have advantages; both have their adherents. I use SS, but I have some old Ansco plastic tanks as well.

    4. If getting a 2-3 reels [120] tank, can i develop 2-3 film rolls at once without issues [same process for the 3 rolls]?
    ******
    Yes.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  6. #16
    Bijesh's Avatar
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    Since the question is about 120 reels, I'll recommend steel reels. I'm a recent convert from plastic (Patterson) to steel reels. I moved to steel reels after I ruined two rolls of film trying to load it on plastic reels. It took about 30 minutes to load it on the reel and finally the film was all kinked. The plastic reels have to be really dry. If you're using a darkroom bag to load the film, your hands are going to sweat after a couple of minutes. This will make the film stick to the reel and it'll refuse to load. 35mm is easy with the plastic reels because it is more rigid and not as wide as the 120.

    Anyway I tried the steel 120 reels and everytime I was able to load the film in less than a minute. I sold all my plastic tanks (had 6 patterson) and bought some kindermann tanks and reels. For 35mm I bought the Hewes stainless steel reels and it's a pleasure to use.

  7. #17

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    Yesterday i was trying to load a 35mm roll on a plastic reel in light, it was not easy [i am sure it a Patterson reel], and when i tried to do it in a changing bag, i think i will never load it on the reel, either the changing bag was not pumped and all the time coming around my hand and i have to move for space, not easy for 35mm then what i will do with a 120? i was practicing on my friend film kit before i buy mine, he has a plastic tank, but i never saw him developing as he tried once and failed and then he decided to develop in the lab always, so i will practice on his developed ruined film with reel until i can do it properly in dark, but in all cases, i want to order and do myself at home everyday, i don't go there to the photography club to use his kit.

  8. #18
    fotch's Avatar
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    When using a changing bag, I use to use a cardboard box that would fit inside so I could keep the bag from laying on top of my hands and film.

    Started with plastic, loading was mostly difficult although sometimes it worked ok. Then switched to stainless steel after finding that the quality brands like Nikor or Kindermann loaded easily every time. Now a days, if buying new, Hewes is the brand to get.

    Returned to plastic only because that is what Jobo uses, however, their plastic reels are pretty good. Now they have stainless steel reels (made by Hewes) but to expensive and not really needed.

    So, when not using the Jobo, I uses stainless steel for 35 or 120.

    YMMV
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  9. #19

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    The question is, should i use a stainless steel reel in a steel tank and plastic reel with plastic tank? or doesn't matter?

    Maybe i will order one plastic and one steel of each, so i can see which is preferable and i will develop 2 film at once separately then rather than both in one tank.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by TareqPhoto View Post
    The question is, should i use a stainless steel reel in a steel tank and plastic reel with plastic tank? or doesn't matter?
    It matters. Plastic tanks have a central column, which is a tube, through which you pour the chemicals. You can't omit it, because it also makes the tank light tight. The inner circle of the plastic reels fits nicely on the tube, but a metal reel probably won't. Tanks and reels are not always interchangeable.

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