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  1. #11
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    , Martin's idea is the way I would go. Depending upon how "permanent" you want it, you might consider light lathes and black mylar sheeting--the kind used for plastic mulching. The heavier stuff is completely light tight.. I made many a "permanent" darkroom that way out of walk-in storage spaces in apartment basements.
    Using Martin's idea, you could make a complete maze entrance.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  2. #12

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    Dear f/stopblues,

    Just looking at the layout, I can't tell that a door is necessary. If there is only one person working at a time you can survive with just turning off the light in the work area.

    Neal Wydra

  3. #13

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    Hi Neal,

    The north side of the basement is only halfway underground and has windows, so some sort of light buffer is necessary.

    I like Martin's idea, but the entry to the basement is in an unfortunate spot for that plan. Check out the updated drawing I attached.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails darkroom.jpg  
    "Technology is a big destroyer of emotion and truth. Opportunity doesn't do anything for creativity. Yeah, it makes it easier and you can get home sooner, but it doesn't make you a more creative person. That's the disease you have to fight in any creative field.. ease of use." - Jack White

  4. #14
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    Any possibility of blocking light at the windows so that you could just leave the space open? That would probably be cheaper and would give you flexibility to move equipment as stated earlier or expand/contract the size of the wet/dry sides as needed.

    If not, I would start with the curtain (or double curtain to ensure it is light tight). The curtain option is more flexible. If you design is so that the curtains can be open then you can improve ventilation and light in the room when doing things like toning or mixing when you don't need darkness.
    Jerold Harter MD

  5. #15

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    I've seen several rotary darkroom doors pop up on the auction place in the past for $250-$300, in fact there's one on Craigslist right now in my area (Oklahoma City) for $400. Not cheap, true, but probably the ultimate deluxe solution. I've never looked at one up close, though, so don't know what you'd do if you needed to move something heavy or long in/out of the room. Maybe they pop off the tracks or something?

  6. #16
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Its a shame you aren't near State College, Pa., someone's giving a rotary darkroom door for free. Saw it on Craigslist. I have a black curtain that I hang over the door with velcro when I'n using the DR for processing, normally its off for all other functions and ease of ingress and egress.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahamp View Post
    I have a pocket door. If I have to move the wet bench out, I will have to unframe the door, but otherwise it works. I have a raised threshold (for a light proofing channel) which may not suit everyone.
    As do I. Some simple weatherstripping felt stapled around the edge of the light-trap (simple wooden 1x1) makes a very tight seal for light and air. I have my air intake louver in the door.

    I'd suggest a pocket door opposite the enlarger, there should be plenty of room for the mechanism.

  8. #18
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    What about light-proofing the whole basement: a few windows should be easy to cover up, and if there is a door to the basement stairs then some weather stripping will light-proof it.

    I did this with an apartment - rather than trying to lightproof the kitchen area I just had black-out drapes over the apartment windows rather than the customary 'sheers'.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  9. #19

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    Nicholas Lindan
    What about light-proofing the whole basement: a few windows should be easy to cover up, and if there is a door to the basement stairs then some weather stripping will light-proof it.
    I'd take this approach, going for the 3 curtain solution if it isn't possible. Curtains work, but in my experience they sometimes pick up chemistry and can be the cause of cross contamination if you have to brush through them - especially if you to share your darkroom with sloppy people. Cloth curtains may also harbour dust and plastic ones can attract dust through static.

    The idea of viewing prints in natural light is attractive, I'd prefer a nice big viewing slab under a consistent light source.
    By opening up your darkroom, you'll benefit from a more comfortable working space in which you can move about freely. (Someone on another post pointed out that working in a cramped space can actually be more tiring and I suspect that's true).

    A larger space would also allow you more options regarding ventilation - enabling you to move a larger volume of air more slowly and to place the supply further away from the enlarger as possible - minimising dust and vibration.

    Regards
    Jerry

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