Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,047   Posts: 1,561,006   Online: 1047
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    aberystwyth west wales uk
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    120

    darkroom chemical question

    hi all i have a question i was looking through the darkroom pic topic of all your rooms and noted some of you had this in your bedrooms and bath rooms

    are the chemicals not to smelly for that or even dangerous to your health

    sorry if this is a dumb question but i have to ask as its one of the things thats putting me off i have no where to put the enlarger or stuff
    Leave nothing but footprints.Kill nothing but time.

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,348
    Images
    148
    Depends what chemistry/chemicals you are using. I wouldn't have a darkroom in a bedroom I was sleeping in but a spare bedroom is different matter. A bathroom no problem.

    Ian

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    844
    Images
    131
    Common darkroom chemistry is pretty inocuous. I have a vent fan, but I only run it with the door open between prints.

    There are some things to avoid. Lith chemistry has formaldehyde, so that should be vented. I avoid skin contact with film developers by using nitrile gloves (if you get them a size big, they can be used several times.) I avoid contact with pyro developers, and if I mix Amidol I will put a mask on. I also wear a mask if mixing hydroquinone or metol.

    Basically, if you are thinking about liquid concentrate developers, regular stop bath and fixer, as long as you don't put the stuff on your cheerios, you will be alright. (I actually like the smell of fixer!)

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    83
    Bathroom is no problem, and these help...
    "I have no idea how to respond to the OP, so in the time honored tradition, I'm going to wade in, anyway!"

  5. #5
    Robert Hall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lehi, Utah
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,040
    Images
    28
    Two most important things to have in a darkroom is ventilation and a drain. Water comes in a close third.
    Robert Hall
    www.RobertHall.com
    www.RobertHall.com/mobile
    Apug Portfolio
    Facebook Profile


    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,348
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hall View Post
    Two most important things to have in a darkroom is ventilation and a drain. Water comes in a close third.
    If there's no running water there's no need for a drain

    Ian

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire, UK.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,216
    Years ago my darkroom was my bedroom at my parent's house. I once did a really long session lasting well into the small hours and I then continued the next day. In between, while I slept, I didn't bother taking down any of my blackout blinds or water baths (chemicals were in a Nova processor). When I woke up I had the worst headache ever. Felt really sick and horrible. Grim. But being young, I went back to printing and just worked through the pain! Clearly a ventilation issue.

    My darkroom is now the cupboard under the stairs next to our sitting room and my wife will not tolerate exotic aromas drifting out of the cupboard. I have to keep everything spotless. All splashes must be wiped up straight away. But it works, no smells emerge, and I'm able to keep a darkroom running so close to the rest of the house.
    Steve.

  8. #8
    CBG
    CBG is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    ... and my wife will not tolerate exotic aromas drifting out of the cupboard. I have to keep everything spotless. All splashes must be wiped up straight away. ...
    Isn't that the way a darkroom should be, clean all the time, no matter what, wife or not? Most chemical items in a darkroom are harmful to finished film and to completed prints, if allowed to accumulate in dried up spills, poorly rinsed hands, encrusted tools ... Once they become dry, and become dusts, they are set free to attack your film and paper, and also your lungs and body. Clean up as soon as you find or even suspect a spill. Preferably when nothing has had time to dry.

    The smelliness question is individual. I don't mind the odor of an acid fix bath, but some find it intolerable. I do not work in a tiny space though. My darkroom is in a basement, and I turn off cellar lights and leave the darkroom door open, so my darkroom is effectively quite big.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,603
    Images
    9
    sprint photo chemicals have very little smell
    and the stop bath is vanilla scented
    you can get their chemicals off their website
    (they are a site sponsor! )

    - john

  10. #10
    Wade D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Jamul, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    887
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    If there's no running water there's no need for a drain

    Ian
    A drain is good if you have to pee

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin