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  1. #1
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    Glass negative holder

    I have a Fujimoto G70 which I enjoy using for my enlarging; however, the negative holders are non-glass. As in, they flip open, you place the negative in the open space, flip close using the metal edge to hold the negative in place and insert. This is not normally a problem with 35mm negatives but yesterday I was having serious problems getting a 6x7 negative flat. I could get some of the negative in focus but not all and the problem increased as the lamp warmed up and the negative began to buckle.

    Can I just buy some small pieces of glass to sandwich the negative and then insert into my current holders or do I need to purchase new holders? The Fujimoto was never exceptionally popular and holders are hard to come by. I have tried using Omega holders but with very limited success. The biggest problem is the holder slot is square and using a round holder does not allow me to fully insert into the space in order to cover the larger negatives.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  2. #2
    fotch's Avatar
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    Is the present negative holders made of metal or plastic? Did another brand, like Omega worked to keep the negative flat?

    As far as glass, did Fujimoto G70 make a set in glass? I am wondering if there is enough space for a thicker sandwich in the Fujimoto G70.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  3. #3
    richard ide's Avatar
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    Could you cut a couple of pieces of glass to fit and use the sandwich in place of the carrier?
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  4. #4
    resummerfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Kehler View Post
    .....Can I just buy some small pieces of glass to sandwich the negative and then insert into my current holders or do I need to purchase new holders?......
    I'm not familiar with the Fujimoto, but could you remove the top of the Fujimoto carrier and substitute a piece of glass? The single top glass should keep the negative flat.

    Another option would be to obtain a glass carrier from a Beseler (or other brand), and then modify the metal part to fit the Fujimoto.

  5. #5
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    The current negative holder is made of metal (aluminium by the weight) with slight raised edges around the opening in order to more firmly hold the negative via contact pressure. I think if I filed the raised edges off, there would be sufficient room to put a least 1 piece of glass (high side, towards light) and still fit in the holder. I also have a brother who is a custom fabricator who might be able to build something.

    This raises another interesting question: on some higher end scanners, a fluid is added in order to help hold the negative flatter and increase resolution. Could you do the same thing on an enlarger, add some fluid to aid in flatness? My immediate concern is uneven coating giving distortion and heat from the bulb "cooking" the negative to the glass which would result in the negative burning onto the glass and ripping when removing. Still it should be the same principle (I know the Hasselblad scanners use it).
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  6. #6
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by resummerfield View Post
    I'm not familiar with the Fujimoto,
    I love my enlarger but this is been my constant problem with it, no one is familar with it and there is no such thing as parts or accessories to be had.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  7. #7

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    There is not much you can't accomplish with some high quality black matboard and a very sharp knife.

    Seems I remember when I had a condenser enlarger, there was a heat absorbing glass disc under the lamp. I don't know if your enlarger has a slot for this.

  8. #8
    richard ide's Avatar
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    I have used both lighter fluild and mineral oil on negatives without problem.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  9. #9
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard ide View Post
    I have used both lighter fluild and mineral oil on negatives without problem.
    How do you clean you negatives afterward? Photoflow and water?
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  10. #10
    resummerfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Kehler View Post
    ..... on some higher end scanners, a fluid is added in order to help hold the negative flatter and increase resolution. Could you do the same thing on an enlarger, add some fluid to aid in flatness?.....
    Scanning fluid in a negative carrier would be messy. On the enlarger you're dealing with a lens that can, and should, be stopped down several stops to it's optimum aperture, which would provide ample depth of field for the negative.

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