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Thread: Egg timer

  1. #1
    Mats_A's Avatar
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    Egg timer

    I am planning to develope some 9x12 cm sheet film taken with myc ICA folding camera. I suppose it will be a tray developement.
    What do you people use to keep track of time in the dark. I had been planning on using a normal egg timer until it dawned on me that I will not be able to set it in the dark. Silly me. What do people use for this? I thought about discoupling the enlarger from the timer and set the timer for 5 minutes and just listen to when it stops and then hit it again. Better ideas? About timers, the timer I'm using has a "glow in the dark" dial. Is this film safe?

    r

    Mats
    Digital is for communication, film is for documentation.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/studiopirilo

  2. #2

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    you could get one of these shimoda, it has a reapeating beep[ quite annoying] when time is up. And it projects no light, just a simple digital kitchen timer with a stand and magnetic back.Takes SR44 battery.
    regards
    CW
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  3. #3

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    A Gralab type timer with green "glow in the dark" hands should not be a problem. Also, you can simply make a cardboard baffle so the light from the timer doesn't shine directly on the developer tray (the film is most sensitive to light before and during development; after it's in the stop, you don't need to worry as much).

    I have used a number of things for my tray developing timer. My permanent darkroom in Oregon has a Zone VI compensating timer with red LED readout, but that is not really necessary.

    In Austria, I simply use a digital kitchen timer (Pakeha, you beat me to it, this is exactly what I have). It has a countdown function which I use to pre-set the developing time. I put it next to the developer tray so that I can easily find the "start" button in the dark. For agitation, I use either a metronome or a loud clock that ticks in seconds, since the time is quiet till "time's up." In the past, I have used just the metronome, counting the entire developing time in my head, however, counting 720 seconds for 12 minutes and keeping the agitation scheme going gets to be troublesome. I prefer a timer to beep at me or have a number to look at at the end of development. BTW, the "beeping" of my kitchen timer is once per second and lasts exactly one minute, which helps timing the stop bath in the dark. I usually transfer to the fix at the end of the beeps and then count seconds (the metronome is still going) till I can turn on the light. The timer is now reading now many minutes past the "time's up" mark; I can simply subtract one minute (the beeping time in the stop) to check exactly how long the negs have been in the fix.

    I tried using my cell phone to time development once in a pinch, but was dismayed when it lit up like fireworks at the end of the developing time! I suppose you could put it in a drawer...

    Best,

    Doremus Scudder
    www.DoremusScudder.com

  4. #4

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    Another option is to use music or spoken voice in the dark.

    You could make up a tape (or mp3) that has 10/30/60 second reminders or even talk yourself through the entire process if you don't mind listening to your own voice?

    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    I tried using my cell phone to time development once in a pinch, but was dismayed when it lit up like fireworks at the end of the developing time! I suppose you could put it in a drawer...
    The Massive Dev chart app for the iPhone has timers built in too, though you would need to hide the phone itself because even with the red light setting enabled, it still would not be filmsafe.

    Mike

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    Mats_A's Avatar
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    Thanks for many good advice.
    Now what about drying? How do you dry a sheet of film? I can't hang it to dry like rollfilm, can I? Is it safe to take it out of the Flo-bath and start using a hair dyer on it? I understand that dust drying on the emulsion is a bit of a problem.

    r

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  7. #7

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    Hang it by one corner using the same clips you use for roll film. You do not need a second clip to weight it as you do with roll film.
    I like to use the notched corner as usually it has the most room between the edge and the image area.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mpirie View Post
    Another option is to use music or spoken voice in the dark.

    You could make up a tape (or mp3) that has 10/30/60 second reminders or even talk yourself through the entire process if you don't mind listening to your own voice?

    Mike
    ***********
    A tape is what I used when developing E-4 in plastic orange juice containers. My voice-over for the intervals and even instructions worked well and the music was pleasant in the dark. Nowadays I use an old-fashioned "hourglass"-type egg timer, near a Paterson safelight on a work surface, for timing my print development. I call it a "silica-based-gravity-operated-fixed-interval-development-timing-device" for short.
    Last edited by Anscojohn; 03-28-2010 at 07:27 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  9. #9

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    The Paterson Orbital Print Processor allows you to process up to four 9x11 sheets at a time. It's a nice little daylight processing system and uses just 150ml of fluid, if I recall.

    The downside is the initial cost. It's no longer in production, so these often cost about $100. Luckily, it's a one-time purchase. Make sure that it has the little plugs that hold the sheets in place, as well as the orbital base.

    Aside from that, perhaps an inexpensive LCD wristwatch with a timer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    ***********
    A tape is what I used when developing E-4 in plastic orange juice containers. My voice-over for the intervals and even instructions worked well and the music was pleasant in the dark. Nowadays I use an old-fashioned "hourglass"-type egg timer, near a Paterson safelight on a work surface, for timing my print development. I call it a "silica-based-gravity-operated-fixed-interval-development-timing-device" for short.
    Love it!

    I used to use a Proctor Silex Kitchen Timer, counts down, beeps for 30 seconds then counts up, though one can't see any info in the dark. Nowadays I just use a Gralab 300 with a sheet of ND filter over it. It is two feet above the developing tray on a shelf. I've not fogged anything up to HP5+ at 400.

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