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  1. #1
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    DIY Green(Kodak No.3) Safelight Filter

    hey all,

    I've decided to make the move up to 8x10 film for view camera work(mostly due to limited space in the 2nd bath, long story...)

    so: I'm looking to give developing by inspection a try(in trays), and so, I'll need a green safelight.

    I've scoured ebay for weeks, no avail. So I'm trying to see if there is a certain gel I could purchase to use over or under a sheet of frosted glass in lieu of the oc filter(glass) that is already in the safelight.

    any ideas?

    -Dan

  2. #2

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    You don't say how big your safe light is but a few years back I bought plastic Kodak No.3 filters in 5x7 fairly cheaply from Porter's Camera Store. They're online now-a-days at www.porters.com

  3. #3
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I believe that a WR 99 is what you want. I would have to look it up for sure, but that should be it.

    PE

  4. #4
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Maybe Michael will chime in, but he writes on the website that he uses a Wratten #3 and 15W bulb. However on the Tiffin site that Wratten 3 is described as follows (so maybe this is a typo on his site):
    Wratten 3 Light yellow. Absorbs excessive sky blue
    I'd try the Rosco #91 Primary Green. I see B&H also carries the proper Kodak #3 Safelight filter for a few dollars more.
    Last edited by ic-racer; 03-29-2010 at 11:37 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Older BJP Almanac's give details on making your own safe-light screens, the information came from work by a small British company Wratten just over 100 years ago, and whose research chemists later became the backbone of all Kodak Research in the US (Rochester) & UK (Harrow).

    I have posted the information here on APUG.

    Ian

  6. #6
    CBG
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    The wratten #3 is not the same as a Kodak #3 safelight filter, not similar, not even close. I would guess whatever appropriately strong dark green rosco would need to be combined with massive layers of neutral density to approximate a Kodak #3 safelight filter. The #3 is reeeeeealy dim.

  7. #7
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    hey guys,

    thanks for the answers. My safelight is a 5x7 Premier. I have a few pieces of 1/8" plate glass I was planning on grinding down, or taking to my friends shop and having him sandblast it on both sides.

    but the filtration was an issue.

    -Dan

  8. #8
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    B&H sells filters for Kodak saflights....
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  9. #9

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    Daniel: Please take ic-racer's excellent advice and take a look at MichaelandPaula.com. They have a vast experience in DBI, and Michael has an excellent and detailed article on exactly how such should be approached. While you're at it, if you've limited space that won't handle an enlarger easily ( and how would you fit an 8x10 enlarger into a small space! ), seriously consider setting up a small area to contact print using the Lodima paper. All one needs is a bulb, a piece of glass to hold the negative and paper securely ( obviously a contact frame might be "better" ), and space for trays. All the information you need is at Michael's site, and do feel free to PM me with any questions that you might have. It is likely that many others here do contact printing, and so there will be lots of advice available to you. The very best of luck.

  10. #10
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