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  1. #11
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I would advise against any vinyl flooring in a darkroom, especially a commercial grade VCT. These types of flooring require regular maintainance, and sealing. They are NOT chemical resistant, and if not prepped properly prior(dang, that was a mouthful)to install, they pop up. Most DIY'ers get the adhesive to thick and have it oozong between tiles making a horrible mess to clean, it must be applied thinly and allowed to flash before laying tiles. A good garage floor or deck paint with anti-fatigue mats is, as most have said before, the best way to go. Save money on the tiles, and spend on supplies.

    Rick

  2. #12
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I went with a floating vinyl floor over dry-core. The edges stick together and installation was very easy. It's waterproof, and so far it's wearing just fine. Nice thing with this arrangement is my feet are about 5 degrees warmer in the winter than just plain concrete.

  3. #13
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    As with John, I put some heavy duty rubber mats on the concrete floor of my darkroom. They came in 3' x 3' sections that interlock and are very comfortable to stand on. Once or twice a year I take them outside and clean them with a hose and brush, and while they are drying I mop the darkroom floor.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  4. #14

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    I used a nice sheet vinyl in my basement darkroom and have been really happy with it.

    Mike

  5. #15

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    Basement Darkroom Floor

    I agree that peel and stick is the worst. I've done some floors myself and I've had them professionally installed as well. If you go with tile you should lay down an orange sheetgoods layer (a closed cell foam specially for this purpose) over which thinset concrete is spread. Tiles are laid on the wet thinset and then grouted. Personally, what I've done in the basement darkroom area is use rubber mats on bare concrete. If I upgrade I will get better mats--cushiony, heavy duty, chemically resistant, commercial kitchen type mats.
    I've got enough projects going as it is.
    "Get over it."

  6. #16
    Trond's Avatar
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    I'm planning on using grey epoxy paint on the concrete floor in my soon-to-be darkroom. Relatively inexpensive, easy to clean and durable (I hope).

    Trond

  7. #17

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    Poured acrylic floor

    I almost went this route with my darkroom. Further research showed me that it wasn't chemically resistant enough, but the biggie for me was that it wasn't sufficiently water proof. Water will go right through it, if slowly. And darkroom chemistry is largely water-based.

    What I did instead was a poured acrylic floor. Seamless. Waterproof. Seriously resistant to the chems. And, any color I wanted. And we added some "sand" into it to make it completely non-slip. All that, and it was only 2/3 the cost of tile.

    And after all that, I've yet to spill anything on it. Sigh... better to have it (and that floor drain) and not need it than need it and not have it.
    Bruce Watson
    AchromaticArts.com

  8. #18
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Has anyone made a fibreglass floor with mat and polyester resin? I have used it for roofing and I think it would make a good darkroom floor as you could continue it up the skirting boards/walls and fronts of cabinets for a few inches and create a fully waterproof tray in the darkroom.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #19
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    I'm going to lay commerical grade vinyl tile onto my cement basement darkroom floor.

    I'm a little bit wiser now, so I'm hoping for a better result.

    Any tips or suggestions before I get started?
    I've used a similar product, also done peel and stick vinyl, and sheet vinyl in various applications. I had sheet vinyl in my prior darkroom. It was only 7x9 feet, so it was cheap and easy to put down. That was over a wood subfloor. However, when I had a water leak, it destroyed the cheap vinyl and I had to replace it.

    In the darkroom I'm currently building, I considered most of the alternatives discussed, but elected to go with ceramic tile, and my one splurge on this project is to have it installed by someone who knows what he is doing. It's not rocket science, but it is hard work and experience (which I don't have) makes the result better.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom
    http://silverdarkroom.wordpress.com

  10. #20

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    I've used epoxy paint as well. It's fine if it is put down on a perfectly dry surface and doesn't get wet from moisture in the concrete. You can sprinkle epoxy flakes into the surface to give it some color. Make sure you have good ventilation when you paint it on.
    "Get over it."

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