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  1. #1
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Darkroom Floor--Laying Tile, any tips?

    I'm going to lay commerical grade vinyl tile onto my cement basement darkroom floor.
    I am going to use Armstrong 1/8" Commerical Vinyl tile. Home Depot sells this "ROBERTS" brand adhesive that I was going to use : http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdf...fe2fdca0bb.pdf

    I'm going to rent a tile cutter and 100lb roller. I have a blowtorch to warm the tile for the intricate cuts.

    I did all the other construction on my darkroom, but I have never put down a professional tile floor, so this will be a first time job. I did lay peel-and-stick in my parents basement when I made a darkroom in 1973. That stuff was horrible, it all peeled up on the edges after a few years. My dad eventually took it all out when I was in college.

    I'm a little bit wiser now, so I'm hoping for a better result.

    Any tips or suggestions before I get started?

  2. #2
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I'm going to go with this gray tile:

    http://www.armstrong.com/commfloorin...?item_id=47158

  3. #3
    Dave Pritchard's Avatar
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    Use a chalk line to make a straight line to align your first row with. Your first tile should ideally be in the center of the room. Start in the middle. Work out toward the edges. This means that you will end up trimming all of the tiles at the walls. Since walls are almost never straight or square with each other, you'd have to trim lots of tiles anyway. Oh, and use the size of notched trowel recommended on the tile adhesive directions.

  4. #4
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    If you haven't already purchased material/tools/etc. have you considered a two part epoxy finish similar to what is used on garage floors? I considered tile in our laundry room in the basement but decided on the epoxy. It comes with some multi-colored flakes for traction and appearance. Much easier and probably cheaper than laying tiles. Just a thought.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  5. #5
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I would recommend against the two part epoxy...at least the kits in the home centers. Mine is pealing up after a couple of years. It looks nothing like an industrial epoxy floor, though. If I could do it again, I'd use sheet vinyl.....those gray tiles are pretty classic, though. With enough wax, the seams would probably not be too bad!

  6. #6
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    Do give some thought to bobwywiwyg's suggestion.

    Unless that floor is really flat and smooth, getting the tile joints tight enough to seal out liquid spills will be a challenge.
    My floor was lumpy enough that I knew tile wouldn't work. Period.
    I used a medium gray concrete paint and laid down anti-fatigue mats. Now I work in my stocking feet (blisssss).

    Harbor Freight has 2 foot square 3/8 inch thick interlocking mats for a couple of bucks apiece.
    They're also available as exercise mats at Wally World...

    Reinhold

    www.classicBWphoto.com

  7. #7

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    Hey, if you really want to lock out spills, there's always ceramic tile on top of backerboard, with epoxy grout. Sheet vinyl flooring is going to be way easier, of course.

    Duncan

  8. #8

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    i didn't bother with tile or formica or any of that stuff
    i have rubber mats and wood plank to stand on and couldn't be happier.

    the darkroom i had when i was a kid had some sort of rubbery-formicay tiles
    and i never liked it ...

    have fun
    john

  9. #9

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    I've bought some 2' sq interlocking matts at Costco,they are easy on my feet but the area's I stand by the sink the most get more squished and distorted so as not to interlock with the others very good.

  10. #10

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    Hi !
    Been there, done that...
    My darkroom floor is concrete, not particularly flat nor smooth.
    As it is concrete you must seal it to avoid fine dust coming out from it.
    I used a clear (sunny yellow) professional garage paint (two coats) to make the floor very attractive and resistant.
    It is easy to clean, very resistant, and being clear, help having the darkroom not so dark ;-)
    Near the enlarger and the sink I have put a rubber fatigue mat (this is very important)...
    The paint was very expensive (bought at a professional store) but really cheaper than vinyl floor plus glue plus extra time for work....
    Of course YMMV ;-)

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