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  1. #21

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    For 500ml, I like the Fuji Water bottles. A square-ish shape, very stable and sturdy.

    For 1 or 1.5L, I stand by Trader Joes water bottles.

    And lastly, for 1.75L with super wide necks (perfect for pouring pot oxalate pt/pd developer), I use Organics Orange Juice bottles available at Von's and it's partners.

    You asked...;-)

  2. #22

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    I use those OJ bottles for 1.75 L as well! I use them primarily for storing old brown. I mix up 2 L when I start printing, and at the end of the session, I fill the OJ bottle and chuck the rest (which is usually very little due to carry over into the fixer and evaporation). When I start a new session, I empty the OJ bottle into the tray, and then add a 200 mL shot of A and B.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #23
    sly
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    Quote Originally Posted by greybeard View Post
    Ummm....guys, it is not generally a good idea to put non-potable stuff into beverage bottles, particularly if the original appearance of the bottle is not drastically altered. Kids, in particular, are apt to take a swig on the assumption that it if weren't soda pop, it wouldn't be in a soda pop bottle.

    Putting automotive antifreeze (ethylene glycol-based) into two-liter soda bottles is one of the more egregious offenses, since the stuff not only looks sort of citrus-y, it actually tastes sweet and it doesn't take much to kill a youngster.

    I can imagine someone mistaking slightly oxidized developer for an herbal tea, and in some cases the taste might actually be better
    This would depend on personal circumstances, wouldn't it? I recycle fruit juice bottles for my chemicals - but my darkroom is in a dedicated room, separate from the house, and those juice bottles are on a shelf above the sink, boldly labelled FIX, or D-76 . My kids are grown and gone, but grandchildren and other youngsters would not have access to that room without supervision. If you use the laundry or bathroom for your developing, have to store the chemicals in the cupboard, have kids at home (or visiting lots) the situation would be quite different.

  4. #24
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I figure that to an uninformed child, a chocolate brown bottle for chemicals looks just about as inviting (likely to contain chocolate milk) as a pop (soda) bottle with a bunch of extra labels on it:

    http://www.adorama.com/DKBAEQ.html

    In my mind, taking care to limit access and to ensure clear labelling are the most important ways to deal with this concern.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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