Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,295   Posts: 1,535,674   Online: 1162
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 39
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    San Francisco
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,080
    Images
    124
    Sometimes I can't believe my Rotatrim is 18 years old and still works like new. It's had a lot of use.

  2. #22
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,232
    Images
    20
    I'd debated about spending the money on a Rotatrim until I saw one in a lab at a workshop, and it looked completely beaten up with blotches of rust on the metal parts, and it still cut perfectly and was in good alignment.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #23
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,544
    Images
    15
    The sharpest of sharps is unbeatable: #23 scalpel blade on #11 handle with steel-edge rule.

    And current life insurance in case you slip-up... These pups cut a mean streak. :o
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  4. #24
    resummerfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Alaska
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,281
    I've used both types, and if used properly with hold-downs, both will give an equally fine cut. However, for large sheets—in my case, over about 12 inches—I find the rotary type much easier to use. I currently use a Rotatrim, and don't plan on going back to the knife style.

  5. #25
    OldBikerPete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    348
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Gilardetti View Post
    Ladies and gentlemen,

    I can't make up my mind between the two main models of paper cutters, which I would primarily use to cut heavy weight photographic paper in the darkroom.

    <snip>.....
    .
    I have had and use both an A4-size razor guillotine and a 48" rotatrim for many years. Both work really well on heavy paper. I use the guillotine for everything it is large enough for, anything bigger (such as my A0 inkjet prints) get the rotatrim. There is nothing to choose in squareness or cut quality between the two.
    Peter.

  6. #26
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Torino, Italy
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    420
    Good morning, and thank you very much for your insight.

    I understand that, although many people use the guillotin-knife with success, there is somewhat more consensus towards the rotary-blade.

    However, as long as I can buy five excellent and locally made guillotin-knife units for the price of the model most people suggested, I will give the guillotin a try first, and eventually switch to the rotary blade in the future in case it will turn out to be not what I need.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  7. #27
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,591
    Images
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    Funny thing is, I never felt it. Didn't even realize there was anything wrong until I noticed the blood all over the paper and the floor.
    That's the sign of a very sharp blade.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #28
    darinwc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,046
    Images
    157
    One thing I would like to add.. if you have a large amount of paper to cut, you can take it to Kinkos and have it cut.
    (of course this is no good for sensitied paper)
    They have hydraulic cutters there.

    Check out your local warehouse store, I just bought a rotary cutter for my wife and it was inexpensive.
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    112
    Like rotary trimmers, there are good guillotine cutters and cheap garbage cutters. My observation is that the larger and heavier models to work better, but they take up a lot of space. You can probably get more precise cutting for less money and better spatial organization with a rotary trimmer. If you are going for a guillotine trimmer, get a heavy-duty model.

  10. #30
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,278
    Images
    60
    I recently found an 18" Rotatrim Mastercut on Craigslist for $40.00.

    I went to see it, and took along some scrap pieces of photographic paper.

    It was easy to trim off 1/2 millimetre slices of those scraps - straight and clean cuts each time.

    It is now sitting happily in a largish clear area below my enlarger .
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin