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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    35mm
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    899
    I would avoid the Durst and go for a Meopta. The spares are easier to find as Meopta still exists, plus used prices will be much lower. The medium format (6x6) model is the Opemus and the newer version is the Opemus 6 - given the easy availability of these things there is no reason to get an older model. Heads available are condenser, Multigrade and Colour. The last two use halogen bulbs, which could be brighter in use, and easier to replace in the future.

    I am happily using an Opemus-6 Super with a "Color-3" head, alongside a huge De Vere 203. I very highly recommend the De Vere but availability and cost could be a problem!

    You seem to have a luxury darkroom in mind (I'm almost jealous) ! For general darkroom items, for example trays etc. or the filters you mentioned, have a look at Macodirect.de.
    Last edited by MartinP; 04-30-2010 at 10:09 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: forgetfullness

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Poland, a Osiek near Oswiecim
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    80
    I can very easly get Durst M605.
    And Meopta enlargers is very easy to buy in poland, but I need enlarger fot work and study.
    The trays etc. I can buy in Krakow in big laboratory equipment company, they have trays, lab glass, etc..
    In good prices. :P

    My good friend has have, all new meopta enlargers, and he saying nothing good about those enlargers.
    Meopta produce Amateur grade equipment.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Poland, a Osiek near Oswiecim
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    80

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    South Norfolk, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,874
    Images
    62
    Conrad,

    I use the Paterson tank series which generally works well but you need to be careful with regard to agitation and process otherwise you can get very noticeable "air bells" on one side of the film (120 - medium format).

    Tom

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Downers Grove Illinois
    Posts
    1,051
    4x5 meters is great.

    Layout so you have wet on one 5 meter side, trays, sink, print washer. On opposite wall all dry processes, enlarger, paper cutter, paper safe, mount press, framing space.

    Put a door on the 4 meter side with a storage cabinet opposite wall.

    Keep the room cleanable, nice tile floor and a decent dust free ceiling and walls. Install air filters and water filters. Keep stuff clean and 98% of your trouble will not happen. If you work in a pit, you will spend hours spotting prints. You need a way to dry prints, but that is a whole topic.

    Leave space for a computer, scanner, and printer, nice desk or low counter top, and comfortable chair. You will find people don`t bother you in the darkroom.

    A tall stool is nice by the trays.

    Make the counter tops high enough for a MALE, not female kitchen top height. Your elbow height less 3 inches or 75mm is about right. Your back will thank you.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Poland, a Osiek near Oswiecim
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    80
    Hello,
    I thinking about 3-4meters long Wet table, 1meter of wall will be for thin wall , and on this thinn wall mount all water filters etc.
    Air, good climatization with filters will be ok?
    All tables etc.. I do with my father.
    And computer... EIZO FlexScan S2232W monitor and EPSON V30 scanner is ok ?

    Lab Glass i buy only made PP , PVC.

    This is actual state of this room:
    Last edited by SadowskiPL; 05-02-2010 at 07:56 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
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    16,152
    Blog Entries
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    how about a drying area for prints and a table for your enlarger/s ?
    get a set of 4 x4s for each leg, and strap them together with 2x3 2 of them.
    1 flush with the top edge of your leg and one a little below it.
    then counter sink screws and screw down 1/2" plywood on the top for the table.

    for the print dryer ... make it the same height as your enlarger table ... and instead of 2x3s to strap them together
    use 1/8" plywood.
    get furring strips / strapping and screw them in opposite eachother on the inside.
    i think my screens are 16x20 or 20x24 so the inside space needs to be that big.
    use the same wood and staple them together to make rectangles or squares or whatever shape you made
    the inside and also staple window screen on the rectangles.
    get plywood and screw or just lay it on the top, and you not only have a drying cabinet for your prints
    but more storage area for your darkroom stuff ( counter space ).

    have fun!
    john

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Poland, a Osiek near Oswiecim
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    80
    Hey,
    Thanks for ideas
    Do you can say something about enlarger LPL 7700 PRO ?

    Or better will be Durst M605 ?
    Last edited by SadowskiPL; 05-03-2010 at 09:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Poland, a Osiek near Oswiecim
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    80
    Ok, I order some lab glass

  10. #20

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Paris, not Texas, but France
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5
    Konrad,
    Regarding the timers, you were wondering between Analyser and StopClock+Zone Master. I got both, but I have to say that, if I first bought the analyser (the "500" version for my Ilford Head), I then switched to the Stopclock + Zone Master. The reason for this is that the Stopclock is much more adapted in my opinion to make fine prints; you always have to make adjustements (dodge or burns of local areas of the print) which are far easier to handle with a Stopclock than with an Analyser, whose features of the timing function are "sacrificed" for the metering part of the instrument.

    And in the light of your budget consideration, I would personally advise to start just to with the Stopclok.

    Marc

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