Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,928   Posts: 1,585,186   Online: 709
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 30
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Somerville, MA USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    393
    Images
    1

    How many tanks do you do at one time?

    When you are developing in spiral tanks, are you doing more than one at a time? I was juggling 3 last night, with different developing times, and it was challenging. Agitation definitely wasn't perfectly consistent, off 10 seconds on one side or the other. And if I started pouring chemicals at the same time, obviously one tank is waiting a bit.

    That said, results looked pretty good.

    What do you do?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,686
    One.

  3. #3
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,245
    Images
    34
    I develope one roll of film at a time. I process within a day of finishing a roll so I dont get a backlog.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  4. #4
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Keeping the British end up in Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,871
    Images
    333
    I do 2 tanks at a time if I have a lot of film to wade through. I usually have two timers and make sure I stagger the 2nd tank time wise so i do not hose up agitation and pour times on the 1st one. 3 would be a challenge.
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Somerville, MA USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    393
    Images
    1
    2 timers!! Great idea.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Somerville, MA USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    393
    Images
    1
    Another question: Is it ok to leave the film longer in the stop or fixer to catch up at the end? Or am I screwing things up? Is there a maximum time film should be stopped or fixed?

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,111
    I've done two at a time. Learned this working at my bi-weekly college newspaper, where I would have as many as a dozen rolls to process by hand, twice a week, and maybe more than that if there was a big game over the weekend. So, pushed rolls (if any) in one tank of two or four, regular rolls in the other tank of four, two timers, off we go. I could get my processing done in a couple hours, which was nice because we still had to print them by hand too. It can be done but it's not necessarily the best choice for critical work...

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,953
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by Sully75 View Post
    Another question: Is it ok to leave the film longer in the stop or fixer to catch up at the end? Or am I screwing things up? Is there a maximum time film should be stopped or fixed?
    Within reason, a little extra time in the stop or the fixer shouldn't matter.

    Anything more than doubling the fixing time would be cause for concern though - if only because you would be wise to wash longer as a result.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,230
    One tank at a time. Can use a bigger tank to accommodate more rolls if needed.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    873
    Images
    24
    I regularly do two tanks at a time, and have done three at one time. I find two manageable, three is doable, but can lead to mistakes for me.

    When I first started doing multiple tanks, I made a chart for each tank and staggered the development. Most of the time, I will start the second tank 3 to 5 minutes after starting the first. By doing this, I make sure that One tank will only need agitating while I am changing chemicals in the other tank. I can pour out and add chemicals within thirty seconds, so changing chemicals in one tank does not interfere with agitating the other tank.

    I use two timers. One timer counts down to zero and the other starts at zero and adds the time. I found this helps to keep me from getting confused. But it is not necessary. But two timers definitely makes it easier.

    If I miscalculate and find i have to change chemicals in both tanks at once, I always make sure that the developer time is correct. If I have to leave one film in the fix for an extra 30 seconds, so be it.

    I also make up all the chemicals for both tanks before starting and have the beakers separated on the counter, the chemicals for tank one on the left, the chemicals for tank two on the right.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin