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Thread: Safety Protocol

  1. #11
    Hexavalent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    By the way, my comment about having a second person is a direct reply to the OP's concern about having strong acid, formalin, etc. Obviously, normal darkroom chemicals aren't that risky. I believe Formaldehyde is both a respiratory irritant and flammable in gaseous form. In certain instances, especially when multiple jar of chemicals were knocked over, it won't take much to go from Oh, no! to situation getting out of hand.
    I don't play with the 'strong stuff' alone - always with another person within yelling range, and informed as to what I'm doing.

    As you mentioned, same goes of high-voltage work. I used to service tube equipment, following the 'one hand in the pocket rule'. On one occasion, I felt this wierd tingling up the back of my neck whilst attending to an Ampeg. My boss gave me an 'ahem' and pointed out that my neck chain was dangling an inch away from the B+ !
    - Ian

  2. #12

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    So.... you know exactly what I'm talking about.... One time, I was servicing a tube based RF amplifier. Bleeder register blew and in a rush (silly me) I didn't short out the filter caps after removing power and waiting for few minutes. Zap! About 1000 volts back of my knuckle to palm path. My colleague had a similar experience with much higher voltage. He nearly lost use of his arm.

    Anyway, I've seen my share of industrial accidents including dismemberment. (not my members...) I've also seen seemingly safe stuff turn into crisis situation rather quickly. I basically trained myself to remain paranoid. Extra caution may slow me down but I'll still be there to do what I need to do - albeit slowly.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #13
    Hexavalent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    So.... I didn't short out the filter caps after removing power and waiting for few minutes. Zap! About 1000 volts back of my knuckle to palm path.
    OUCH!
    My boss taught me a lesson by leaving a supply cap on the workbench, natch I picked it up.. ZAP. Never trust big capacitors. That was my lesson before he let me work on any large photo-flash units.
    - Ian

  4. #14

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    Ah yes, the taste of copper under your tongue as the chair rolls backward with you in it... I have seen too many industrial accidents too. Used to be a welder, have cut trees for a job, and generally lived manual labor most of my life. I'm paranoid in the same way and have seen people die on the job as well as have parts of themselves removed by machines.

    Yes, I missed the fact you were talking about formaldehyde and such. I have used Potassium FeriCyanide (sp?) and had someone around for that. Nasty stuff really.

    On a lighter note, a jolt because your welding ground is behind you and you forget about it and lean up against the part you are welding on, does tend to wake you up!
    Tim Flynn

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