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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mundelein, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    996
    Images
    1

    Hand inversion processing with Jobo 3033 and 3073 long roll 35mm

    Well, it can be done! With a Jobo 3033 tank and 3073 reel (but no Jobo processor), I developed some film from my Canon FN-100 back. Here's how...

    The tank is "cog-only" tank but in fact that's not really true. The cog pries out, leaving you with a standard opening that can be covered by one of the standard Jobo red rubber lids. The tank is intended for rotary processing and I suppose you could buy the hand-rolling rig Jobo made, or even just roll it around on the table, but I wanted to do it the way I'm used to, with hand inversion, so that's how I did it. It takes about 48 US ounces of chemicals to fully cover the reel, so there's the one downside of the hand inversion approach: I can do four Hewes reels in a Nikor tank with only 32 ounces, and that's 144 frames vs only 100 here. But developer is reasonably cheap, and I reuse the stop and fixer anyway.

    Loading the reel is tedious, but not really any different from a normal smaller stainless reel. In the dark as you are about to load it, you need to use a single-hole punch tool (like from an office supply store) to punch a reasonably centered hole in the end of the film, fairly close to the end but still leaving film on all sides of the hole. Then flip open the clip on the reel hub and put the film hole on the spike then flip the clip closed again. Here's the only tricky part: you're reaching down into the center of a fairly deep reel. You're clipping in film at a weird angle, which wants to twist the film in directions that are not conducive to loading. But eventually you can get it warped around to where it needs to go and get it fed into the opening of the spiral down near the hub... then it's just like any stainless reel, where you keep a slight bow to the film as you guide it in dead-center between the reel sides and lightly hold the remaining film on its reel at the edge as you spin the reel and guide all dozen-plus feet down into the spiral. As with anything, practice practice practice in the light with scrap film first.

    Drop the reel into the tank, close the tank, and now proceed with your normal inversion processing techniques. When all is done you need to get the lid off...Jobo made a foot pump to pop it off with air pressure but of course that will no longer fit in the larger cog-less opening. You could rig up an adapter... or just do what I did, which is to grab the tank and lid at the gap with fingers from both hands and yank... then spin the tank around a bit, and do it again... eventually "walking" the lid off the tank. Your shirt will get wet.

    There's a center peg in the tank, which makes washing the film difficult since you can't just pour water down the center and have it come up the sides. I need to work out a better plan for washing. As it was I just stood at the sink manipulating the reel in the water.

    After a soak in PhotoFlo, I simply clipped the outside end of the film to the top of my drying rack, unspooled it until I was near the floor, then very carefully cut the dripping film between frames. I used a Paterson film clip with the little spikes, to hang it through one of the lower sprocket holes without piercing the film. Another Paterson hanger through a sprocket hole up top, then unspool and cut, and so on, until it's all hanging to dry. If I were more clever I would have made sure I was cutting at a multiple of 6 frames.

    So there you have it - all your standard techniques, but for longer lengths of film.

    Jobo made a loader for these reels, but to me it seems insane. Anyone used one and had it work? Looks like you unscrew the knurled nut that holds on the top half of the spiral and lift it off. Then use the loader to wind the film onto just the lower half of the spiral. Then lower the top half back onto the film and cinch down the knurled nut. I simply can't picture the film all sitting there nice and straight and perfect in the lower spiral while you lower the upper spiral onto it. Surely some of the film wouldn't be wanting to land perfectly in the upper grooves as they are lowered, creating a complete mess...? To me it's simpler to just wind it on by hand like with any stainless reel.

    Duncan

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mundelein, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    996
    Images
    1
    OK, I realized I never posted pictures of this rig, so I am fixing that now. Also, since I posted this, I bought a big "number 12" rubber stopper with center hole, which I just used to replace the original stopper that fit into the cog. That stopper perfectly wegdes into the big cogless opening of the tank and allows the foot pump to pop the top off.

    Duncan











 

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