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  1. #1
    Athiril's Avatar
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    The Pyro Densitometer advertised on APUG

    That looks like a good deal, except I dont use Pyro.

    Is this also accurate densiometer for non-stained b&w and colour? If not is there anything that can be had in that price range as a decent densiometer?

  2. #2
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    That looks like a good deal, except I dont use Pyro.

    Is this also accurate densiometer for non-stained b&w and colour? If not is there anything that can be had in that price range as a decent densiometer?
    Where?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #3
    Athiril's Avatar
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  4. #4
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    I'm not familiar with the product, but it doesn't look as it would work as a reflection densitometer. Densitometers come as transmission for film, reflection for prints or both. You really want one that can do both, but this may be a nice way to get into sensitometry and densitometry. If you are concerned about the specialized Pyro feature, look at other darkroom meters with densitometer functionality. Here is one from another APUG sponsor:

    http://www.rhdesigns.co.uk/darkroom/...master_ii.html

    There may be others.

    Here is a link to a professional densitometer:

    http://www.rhdesigns.co.uk/darkroom/...itometers.html

    I own both and can recommend them highly. (expensive but good)
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #5
    Alex Bishop-Thorpe's Avatar
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    Of course, they sell the exact same model not calibrated for pyro: Darkroom Automation Enlarging Meter. Cheaper too.

    I was looking at them myself, so I'm interested.
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
    Blog thing!.

    Worry less. Photograph more.

  6. #6
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Regarding the Darkroom Automation Enlarging Meter/Densitometer:

    1) If you don't use pyro film developer, or aren't interested in metering pyro negatives, then there is no reason to buy the pyro version - the only real difference between the two is the software. There is no performance advantage to the pyro model.

    2) The meter accurately measures the effective negative density in your enlarging equipment. Bench densitometer readings may not correspond with the density your negatives produce in your enlarger because of Calier effects and flare.

    3) It only works with black and white negatives. If you are working with color then you are better off with a 'color analyzer'.

    4) The meter reads density in stops rather than OD. In the darkroom, stops are more useful. In a chemistry laboratory, OTOH, OD is more useful. The resolution of the meter is 0.01 stop (equivalent to 0.003 OD), it reads over a 10 stop (3.0 OD) range.

    5) In addition to working as a densitometer, it works as an enlarging meter to determine paper grade, paper exposure, and dodge and burn exposures.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  7. #7
    Athiril's Avatar
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    But you can have over 10 stops with certain development in a 3.0 density... edit: I mean original scene contrast though. Not the amount of light the negative blocks or passes >.< bah

    I want a densiometer measuring in OD, and directly from the negative, I'm not after an enlarging meter, I'd like one for both colour and b&w, I guess that means separate equipment.

    The darkroom automation meter, says it works as a densiometer, but is it from an enlarger or directly from the negative?
    Last edited by Athiril; 05-17-2010 at 03:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    The darkroom automation meter, says it works as a densiometer, but is it from an enlarger or directly from the negative?
    It is what is called an 'easel densitometer'. It measures the density a negative produces when it is projected by your enlarger. Obviously, if you are doing contacting then this isn't the right densitometer for you. If you are enlarging, though, an easel densitometer produces better measurements. Two negatives can read the same density in a bench densitometer but produce different densities when enlarged because one is a thick emulsion film and the other a thin emulsion and have different callier coefficients or because flare from clear shadows areas is reducing highlight density.

    Another real advantage to an easel densitometer is the size of the measuring spot. Because a bench densitometer works at 1:1 it can't measure highlights or small shadow details on small negatives (and many big negatives). An easel densitometer works at the print size and so can measure small highlight and shadow details about 2mm in size.

    A color densitometer won't be of much help printing, they are designed for graphic arts applications and for quality control in color labs. A color analyzer will produce density measurements on the easel. The effective density for a color negative will change with different papers. Color analyzers have provisions for paper calibration - some with plug in modules for each paper you are using.

    If you are doing Zone-system type film testing then either an easel or bench densitometer can be used. However, realize that the purpose of zone system testing is to match the film to the paper - the magic 0.1 over B+F isn't a number carved in stone but one found to produce good prints on the paper the folks who came up with the number were using. If you are using a different paper you may find you get the best prints with a speed point at 0.2 OD. Because the end-point of Zone system is the print, measuring the effective density your negative produces in your equipment is the real number you are looking for. Once you have your system calibrated for one film it is easy to find the exposure and development parameters that give you the same print densities for another film and process.

    If your interest is scientific, and not aimed at producing prints, then a bench densitometer may be a better choice.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 05-17-2010 at 07:57 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  9. #9

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    I have the original, non-pyro version of the Darkroom Automation enlarging meter and I find it to be a very handy tool. You can use it to quickly find the density range of your negative in your enlarger with your enlarging lens. It's quick and easy to use, the price is very affordable, and I highly recommend it.

    I actually intend to send mine in to get upgraded to the pyro version one of these days.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    The darkroom automation meter, says it works as a densiometer, but is it from an enlarger or directly from the negative?
    You can simply place the negative directly over the sensor of the Darkroom Automation meter and use your enlarger as a light source to make readings of the negative as a densitometer.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

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