Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,727   Posts: 1,515,104   Online: 1192
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,025

    Help for loading 120 roll film onto spirals

    In case you are not already doing this...In the dark snip off the corners (roughly 45 degrees) from the film before it is loaded on. It makes it easier by far to get the 'leader' past the ball bearings in plastic spirals and prevents the leading corners getting mangled- esp with thin based films such as apx100 and acros. Will make a big difference....which I am reminded of whenever I forget to do it....

    Oh and avoid humid conditions and getting sweaty in changing bags as all help make the emulsion tacky and make it stick.


    Tom

  2. #2
    argentic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Echandelys, Auvergne, France
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,709
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stanworth
    In case you are not already doing this...In the dark snip off the corners (roughly 45 degrees) from the film before it is loaded on.
    I do this with a nailclipper. Makes it a lot easier in the dark.

    Gilbert
    Wilbert
    http://www.photovergne.com
    Cours photo en Auvergne

  3. #3
    Dave Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Middle England
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,894
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by argentic
    I do this with a nailclipper. Makes it a lot easier in the dark.

    Gilbert
    Sometimes someone comes up with a real gem, and makes life so much easier. Those who have spilled blood in a changing bag will know what I mean!
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  4. #4
    ThomHarrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    172
    Images
    6
    If you are using Patterson reels you will also find that if there is one drop of water anywhere on the reel the film will not go past it. Whenever I load anything on Patterson's I blow them with the hot setting on my hairdryer first to make sure they are bone dry.

  5. #5
    fingel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    298
    Images
    4
    Something I do to keep my changing bag free from humidity is put a couple of those little bags of silica that you get with electronic equipment in it. That way when you start to sweat in those bags, it absorbs the moisture.
    Scott Stadler

  6. #6
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Elk, California
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    2,448
    Images
    33
    Also, the two sides of the Patterson reel can get crooked to each other, making loading impossible. Just wiggle them a little and they become straight again.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    625
    When I cut the corners off, it becomes harder to get the last part of the film onto the reel. I think this is because the leading end of the film is then free to curl inward, causing more friction against the groove.

    I have no problem getting the uncut end of the film past the little balls - I just grab it by the leading edge and drag it in. There's no exposure there to be ruined by handling or mangling anyway.

  8. #8
    dr bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Annapolis, Md
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    871
    Images
    14
    This is a personal thing, I know and preferences may differ, but I have a a collection of plastic reels, some Patterson, and ss reels. I much prefer the ss reels for both 35mm and 120 films. In either case, the reels must be dry. I have also had the best (easiest) results by clipping the leading edge corners.

    In loading a ss reel, I find that giving the film a gentle tug after a couple of rotations helps center the film width-wise, which aids in alignment. Good center alignment is quite necessary for a correct load. I believe most loading difficulties with ss reels occur due to poor centering of the film at the start. Practice will help in all cases, plastic or ss.
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  9. #9
    Stan. L-B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    London & Friars Cliff Dorset UK
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    342
    Images
    1
    Now for the other side. I have never found it necessary to cut the corners off the edges of the lead-in of film. I do however bend back, against the curl, the leading 1/4 inch of film. I use Jobo, Rodinax and Patterson reels and all are trouble fee if - DRY!

    As stated, it pays to keep loading a dud film till you can do it, any which way, in the dark and standing on your head!

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    near Amsterdam, Holland
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    747
    Images
    9
    Has any of you guys (or girls) ever tried loading two rollfilms onto one Patterson reel; one behind the other? Somebody taught me that trick, and I am still thankful! It means that you only use 50% of the developer that you would use for two separate reels, and also the tank is a lot less heavy, which in my case is a huge bonus.

    Really, there is plenty of room on a reel to do that. Try it.

    Anne Marieke

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin