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  1. #11
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    For $6 I think I'll try that (scroll down to "14" framing brush") http://www.grignonsart.com/picture_f...hing_Tools.htm

  2. #12
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    I went down to the local artist's store and bought a 2-inch short bristle badger brush. It's a very fine and soft bristle, and I've never scratched a negative.

  3. #13
    richard ide's Avatar
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    That framing brush will do the same job of scratching that the other one would. Guaranteed.

    I used to buy an aerosol antistatic spray from a graphic arts supplier. Very little on a piece of cotton cloth will help to keep dust at bay without leaving a residue.
    Last edited by richard ide; 06-09-2010 at 10:55 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  4. #14
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richard ide View Post
    That framing brush will do the same job of scratching that the other one would. Guaranteed.
    Scratching the glass?

  5. #15
    richard ide's Avatar
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    That too in time. As well as using compressed air, I used only glass cleaner on lint free industrial wipes on the glass. You want a soft fine hair brush if you are going that route for both film and glass. Nothing else except glass cleaner.
    From the experience of hundreds of thousands of enlargements.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  6. #16
    clayne's Avatar
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    There is no way any of those is going to scratch glass. A negative maybe. Glass, definitely not. ICR I've had good luck with the cotton pads that FS sells. While they leave their own small amount of lint - the difference is this lint blows off very easily because it's more substantial in weight/size than simple dust particles. I clean the carriers at the beginning of every darkroom session or so - not every time I change negatives. I clean negatives before I put them in the carrier - but for that I use an expensive Kinetronics KSE device.

    These: http://www.freestylephoto.biz/232341...ipes-4-x-4-100
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    What is a good glass cleaner for negative carriers - ie something that doesn't leave behind any sort of chemical residue that might damage negatives over time?
    thanks
    Windex works fine. No need to get too fancy. I take the glass out of my 10x10 carrier to clean it. That's why I use gloves when handling to keep the finger prints off.

  8. #18
    langedp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    I'd like to know more about those that are using compressed air. I have the cans but they are a whimpy for a big area of glass. My shop air compressor for air tools blows moisture and is quite loud. I'd have to put the compressor in another room and pipe the air in after going through a dryer and filter. Is that what you guys are doing?
    I have several air compressors but I just use canned air in the darkroom. I have a large 10x10 Durst horizontal enlarger with a big negative carrier. The canned air works fine. You don't need to blow the dust into the next county. Just enough to get it off the glass.

    I do use my Kinetronics brush on the glass from time to time but not on my negatives anymore. I've noticed very fine scratches on some of my negs from it. Keep the negative clean and in sleeves and compressed air should be all you need.

  9. #19
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Follow up on this thread. I wound up getting the Kinetronics SW-281 11" in vinyl pouch w/grounding cord

    http://www.kinetronics.com/store/wisk1.html

  10. #20
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Hi,

    I would definitely get a moisture trap for your compressor, just on GP.

    As for noise, you can fill the tank ahead of time while you wait in a more quite area, and then turn off the automatic switch once it is full. You probably won't need more compressed air than is in a household-sized tank to clean the carrier any one time.

    Filling up the tank to more pressure than is needed, and using a regulator to control (decrease) the pressure that you will use to clean the carrier would be a good thing to do. You will then be working at a constant pressure (at least up to the point at which tank pressure falls below your regulator's setting), as opposed to working with constantly decreasing pressure. And that way you also won't be using excessive pressure, which can make more of a mess in your darkroom than the one you intended to clean up in the first place.

    Also, be sure to open the drain valve at the end of the session. Water will accumulate in the tank and rust if you do not. That means shorter tank life, and potentially more water in the hose.

    ...and even more importantly, don't forget to close the drain valve once the tank is emptied of fluid. If you don't close it, and you leave it on automatic, your compressor will run continuously to try to maintain pressure as the air leaks out, which will destroy it.

    And there is also ear protection. Always a good idea anyhow when working around compressors.

    I have a small compressor with a regulator and water trap. Instead of running a line from it to whatever I am working on each time, I have lines wired up through the garage and darkroom permanently, with a few attachment points. One is in the darkroom, and two in the garage. (The garage and darkroom are adjacent to each other on a semi-subterranean level of the house.)
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 07-22-2011 at 10:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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