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Thread: Spot Pens

  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I use them on RC to reasonable effect.

    FWIW, I'm a klutz when it comes to brushes of any type.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12

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    I've tried these. I don't like them. They're too "wet". I prefer using a brush with spotting dyes so I can essentialy dry-brush the dye onto the paper in many thing layers.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by vdonovan View Post

    But it is nice to have a range of pre-mixed tones easily at hand.
    If only the tone that comes *out* of the pen would be the same as what's *on* the pen...

    I've used them years ago and wouldn't go back unless there is no alternative.

  4. #14
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    Thanks for your responses. I think I'm leaning toward sticking with spot tone like dyes and the triple zero brush. But like Matt, I'm sometimes a klutz with the brush, and have to wet and dry the print all over. There's no perfect solution to this, and I gather whether you use a brush or a pen, it takes patience and practice to spot prints quickly and accurately. And in the years I've been doing it... I still need more practice! That said, I have gotten very good at ridding my negs of dust, so I don't usually have too many spots to fix.

    Again... thanks!

  5. #15

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    Me too! Keeping your negatives clean is the best way to spot prints I've learned over the years. As we all know, it's not always possible.

    Print spotting is tough work, maybe the hardest part of making a nice print. The trick, I think, is to use as dry a brush as possible, and to blot, blot, blot with each spot. Takes a long time to build up density that way, but you don't get the halos and other artifacts associated with print spotting.
    Frank Schifano

  6. #16
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Hate the pens, I have a bit of spotone left but I also use the dyes from Marshall.

    R
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  7. #17

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    I should have made one more point about Tetenal pens which I would think applies to Spotpens. You really need a "warm" set for WT paper so, yes, if you use both neutral and WT paper that's two sets which starts to get expensive but as I said each set is likely to last a lifetime of spotting.

    pentaxuser

  8. #18

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    I have a set of the pens, and my experience has been pretty much as stated, they look good but I've not been real impressed in using them. I went and got some NOS spottone to use instead.
    But, if you want to try the pens out, I'll try to have them with me for the next NE AUG outing we both attend and you can borrow them if you like.

  9. #19
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I was VERY happy with using them when I was printing silver-gelatin. I hated spot-tone dye because I could never mix "just right". The Spot Pens came out great, and I found it easy to work with them - when in doubt, start with a lighter shade than you think you need - if it's wrong, it basically won't have any effect. When it's right, it blends perfectly. If you goof, just a tiny bit of moisture on a cloth (or a fingertip) suffices to remove the bad spotting and you're off to the races. And they come in cool tone and warm tone varieties. The first set of cool tone pens I bought over a decade ago are still working.

  10. #20
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I am horrible at spotting, but what works best for me is the watercolor sheets that freestyle sells. I find it easier to get the right tone and density.

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