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  1. #11

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    Jan 2005
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    Roller transport. Film goes over and under a serioer rollers and thru the solutions, then wash and dry. Comonly done for Color C41 today. Works for black and white also.

    You can load 4 reels and put them on a lift rod and develope in a 4x5 deep tank. Spin during immersion and retrieval, tilt 30 deg to drain while out. I can use the same developer I use for 4x5 film on hangars. Gallon tanks can take more.

    Home process 4 films a month, closed tank and timer is the best way so long as you don`t try any fancy agitations schemes touted on the internet. Just follow the instructions on Kodak website, publication J78.

  2. #12
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Dec 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern-Lights View Post
    So, I know that a lot of people use a daylight developing tank when they develop roll film, my question is, what do you use if you don't use a daylight developing tank.
    ********
    I string some ss reels on a lifting rod and soup them in gallon tanks. I have darkroom timer with selectable beep intervals.

    As a kid, I did the see-saw in a tray.

    All in total dark, of course.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #13

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    Aug 2005
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    NYC
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    I have a 3.5 gallon tank line I put together over this last year that I run film in. 18 up 120 or 30 up 35mm, or sheet film of course. I use one shot HC-110 and Rodinal. I had a seasoned tank of xtol going, but prefer the other developers for some practical reasons in my work environment.

    I use a Gralab timer about eye level as my timer.

    It's a great way to run film, but has taken me a lot of practice to get consistent at. It's MUCH more difficult for roll film than daylight tanks. I still have the odd trouble w/ it sometimes...

    I set it up maybe once or twice a month. It's the only way I can process the amount of film I shoot and stay sane.

  4. #14

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    Dec 2008
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    Milepost 30 Hudson Divison NY
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    My workflow uses a modified dip and dunk process with small tanks. I set up three stainless steel tanks each filled with developer/ stop/ fix and set them in a water bath. Once the film is loaded on the stainless steel reel I drop it in the developer tank, place the cap on it, and begin the development process with the lights on as normal. Just prior to the film reaching the desired development time the lights go out and the cap is removed. The reels are loaded in the tank with a lift rod and are transferred to the stop tank when the development time is reached. After the stop bath is completed the reels are transferred in the dark to the fixer tank. The lights remain off until half the fix time is reached when they are turned on to see if the film has cleared. I find this allows for a much more precise time change between solutions.

  5. #15
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Never tried it but...

    I remember an article on Peterson's Photographic magazine had an article on using golf club tubes. If I remember correctly, you would insert your film into the tube, fill it with developer so there's a bubble inside to allow agitation. You could soup your film in daylight.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Ontario, Canada
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    This deviates from the original question, but I've seen eBay auctions for Kodak tanks that can be loaded in daylight. Here's an example of a completed auction. I've never seen one of these in person. It seems like it could be handy in some situations, but I don't know how well this design works in practice.
    I have one of those tanks never used it and i am keeping it as a collectors item.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    May 2003
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    Valley Stream, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    This deviates from the original question, but I've seen eBay auctions for Kodak tanks that can be loaded in daylight. Here's an example of a completed auction. I've never seen one of these in person. It seems like it could be handy in some situations, but I don't know how well this design works in practice.
    There was also two daylight loading tank made by Agfa carrying the Rodinax brand, the 35U and the 60. See the instruction manuals for the tanks here and here. I have the 35U and while it works ok, it's a real PITA to use. Part of the reel is always out of the the solution, so constant agitation is imperative.

    To answer your question, the only other practical alternative is something using deep tanks and reels. The see-saw method works, but try doing that with a 5 1/2 ft long roll of 35 mm film. Not a pleasant thought. The method is somewhat more doable with 120 roll film, but it's still messy, and hardly conducive to producing consistent results.

    There's a reason the currently popular styles of stainless steel and plastic tanks are so. They work, and are for most hobbyists, the most practical and cost efficient compromise.
    Frank Schifano

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