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  1. #21

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    I may end up with 16x20, but who knows, i checked and it seems larger than 16x20 trays are not much available and it is not so cheap[but doesn't matter].

  2. #22
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TareqPhoto View Post
    I may end up with 16x20, but who knows, i checked and it seems larger than 16x20 trays are not much available and it is not so cheap[but doesn't matter].
    Tareq:

    Don't forget that 16 x 20 trays require almost four times as much chemistry as 8 x 10 trays. Even if you do buy 16 x 20 trays, there will be many times you will appreciate having the 8 x 10 trays as well.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Tareq:

    Don't forget that 16 x 20 trays require almost four times as much chemistry as 8 x 10 trays. Even if you do buy 16 x 20 trays, there will be many times you will appreciate having the 8 x 10 trays as well.
    I know i need more chemicals for bigger trays, doesn't matter, in all cases as long i will print something larger, i think i will go with 16x20, 8x10 is so small as prints for me, even with digital printing i don't go with 8x10, i print minimum A3, and few times i print at 8x10 or smaller, it will be the same if i will print in darkroom, i always love larger sizes than small, and i think i may get smaller trays for 8x10, in all cases i know myself that i always go with many options than one, when i printed some of my negs during the workshop on 8x10 i was not so much impressed about it, but when i printed larger then i got impressed, so for me 8x10 will be just test prints but not actual serious prints, but if you telling me that because it is too much to go larger than 8x10 then i can understand your points.

  4. #24

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    Hard to find but I've used a rocking print tray (Honeywell or Heath/Mitchell).
    Only ONE tray to deal with, so less setup and cleanup work.
    But you do have to have containers/cups to pour from/to.

  5. #25

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    I have a dedicated room for printing but still is temporary setup because there is no plumbing and it's just a spare bedroom. Film processing is done in a master bathroom.

    I save on my setup time by having chemistry already mixed and bottled. For example, my developers (Dektol and D76) are bottled in 8 oz containers, so it's per "serving". Stop bath is already mixed and I actually re-use it, not because of money factor but for convenience. As to clean up, bottle up stop and fix, then take everything outside and hose them clean and prop them up to dry. It's actually pretty quick.

    Tareq, have you ever tried to lift 16x20 tray with 1 gallon of chemical in it? It's pain. My suggestion is to go ahead and get a set of 8x10 and 11x14 trays. They aren't that expensive and much easier to handle.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #26

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    At one time I stored chems outside the dry laundry DR. Storing chems in the room reduced set-up time. I pre-position 2L of water to mix developer/stop. That reduced wasted steps to use a kitchen faucet for water. When enlarging on 11x14 paper I use a single tray method as space is limited. Tray space extended by use of thin plywood on top of a washer.

    The Valoy II pictured is a high quality portable small format enlarger. The best! A Durst 600 is a quality but portable MF enlarger.

    When enlarging MF I replace the Leitz Valoy II enlarger with a LPL 670.

    I use the laundry DR at night. Prints are moved to a water hold tray located in the kitchen. My print washer is a 12x18 inch tray using the dump and fill method.

    A complex DR can be more efficient but is unnecessary. It takes more time to make the coffee than to set up.
    Last edited by Richard Jepsen; 03-12-2013 at 04:36 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    RJ

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