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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wade D View Post
    ...The SS reels and tank are much more compact than plastic and use less chemistry. Easier to maintain temp in a bath as well. Thanks all!
    Wade, there's always the other side of the coin. It's true that you can get a SS tank to the desired temperature quicker than a plastic one. It's also true that the temperature of/in a SS tank will drift quicker. A plastic tank, once at the desire temperature, will maintain it longer than the SS ones.

  2. #22

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    I have several 120 SS reels, unknown brand, that don't have any type of clip. Just hold the film over one of the bars and start loading.

    Mike

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anon Ymous View Post
    It's also true that the temperature of/in a SS tank will drift quicker. A plastic tank, once at the desire temperature, will maintain it longer than the SS ones.
    This is one reason to get in to the habit of keeping the tank and bottles in a water bath at the right temperature. Far less time is required to equilibrate a steel tank in a water bath than a plastic one. That said, it's all down to how one is organised. I've used a plastic tank since the sixties without problem, simply by following the water bath scheme. I've now moved on to steel tanks and I prefer them now.
    Alex

  4. #24
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    For clarity, I would point out that for 35mm, I use SS reels without clips, and they work fine. The ones I use have a little "C" shaped wire frame - you push the film into the "C" and it crimps slightly, which is enough to hold it in the reel.

    I've seen the Kindermann reels with the spike. In fact, I remember selling them when they were new, current stock . I don't recall, however, whether they were available for 120, or just for 35mm.

    As for aprons, I have original Kodak aprons that work fine. The problem with the aprons is that they don't work well in inversion tanks. There is a problem with how the chemistry flows around and through the apron. If you use the Kodak tanks you are unable to use inversion agitation and you use a lot of chemistry.

    I can load 120 on to SS reels without using the clips, but if I use rotation agitation, about half the time the film starts walking itself out of the reel.

    In a perfect world, the SS 120 reels would have a latchable clip that one could latch open, insert the film, and then release the latch so it would hold.

    Alternatively, the SS 120 reels could have a gate at the outside end that one could close, preventing the film from working it's way out.

    In the meantime, I use the plastic AP clone reels in Patterson tanks for 120, and SS reels in SS tanks for 35mm. The plastic reels cause problems sometimes, and require too much chemistry, but I can make do .
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #25
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    I like reading your post and your wealth of experience. I never tried the Kodak aprons and didn't know you couldn't invert or the problems you would have if you did.

    I have a reel that has a clip that you snap open, stick the film into it, then snap it shut. I don't remember if its on a 120 or 35.

    Other than a JOBO, how do you rotate a SS in a SS tank? I know you can twist and invert and such, and I never had any film walk out. When i think of twist or twirling, I think of the plastic tank with a stick or rod coming up the middle of the tanks, like the old Ansco or Yankee tanks.

    I wonder what happens with the JOBO SS reels in use on one of their processors?
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  6. #26
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    I like reading your post and your wealth of experience. I never tried the Kodak aprons and didn't know you couldn't invert or the problems you would have if you did.

    I have a reel that has a clip that you snap open, stick the film into it, then snap it shut. I don't remember if its on a 120 or 35.

    Other than a JOBO, how do you rotate a SS in a SS tank? I know you can twist and invert and such, and I never had any film walk out. When i think of twist or twirling, I think of the plastic tank with a stick or rod coming up the middle of the tanks, like the old Ansco or Yankee tanks.

    I wonder what happens with the JOBO SS reels in use on one of their processors?
    fotch:

    The reason you cannot invert the Kodak apron tanks is that there is no way to close them - the fill spout on the top lid doesn't have a lid of its own. If you invert them, all the chemistry will pour out.

    As for continuous rotary agitation of the tanks (whether SS or plastic), I put them inside a larger plastic container, and then put the whole contraption on a Beseler roller processor. That roller processor reverses every few seconds. Prior to using this roller processor, I used one that didn't automatically reverse, so I manually reversed the tanks every 30 seconds.
    Last edited by MattKing; 07-09-2010 at 08:39 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: grammer
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #27
    fotch's Avatar
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    Ah, I got it. And the Jobo SS reels are made by Hewes and have the spocket hooks for 35mm and must have some sort of clip for the 120, hence, don't unravel.

    Thanks.
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikebarger View Post
    You may do this, but folding the tape over the end of the film gives it a little stiffness. I think this helps me load 120 reels.
    Golly, but that worked perfectly. I loaded a reel this afternoon with the tape end first, and it slipped under the holding spring at the first attempt, in less than two seconds, and loaded straight away. The fastest load I've ever achieved in any tank. Excellent tip.
    Alex

  9. #29
    fotch's Avatar
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    Congrats. SS forever.
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