Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,553   Posts: 1,544,966   Online: 758
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    832
    Images
    131
    Are there any sort of plug-in models out there? Sans new plumbing, I can only draw about a gallon per minute total, so to operate in winter I would probably need a constant 90-95f at about half gallon per minute. Seems like there should be something out there for livestock, to keep water from freezing.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,280
    Images
    4
    There are very small electric units that plug into 120v outlet. I don't know where you are located but Home Depot (for example) has a couple of different 2.5gal. But you have to look at the amp draw and the wiring you have available. For example, the 2.5gal model draws 12.5 amps - which might be OK depending on the circuit. A 6 gal, 120v model draws 16.7 amps - too much for most existing home 120v wiring.

    Without going into too much detail, you probably have a 15amp circuit on 14 ga wiring (if in US). So the 6 gal will draw too much current. The 2.5gal would be ok IF there is not too much else drawing on that circuit when the water heater turns on. If your wiring is 12ga, you might have a 20amp breaker so you'll be OK with the 2.5gal and marginal with the 6 gal. Look at the circuit breaker in the box for that circuit and see if it's marked 15amp or 20amp.

    Another possibility might be one of the very small tankless heaters designed for under the sink cabinet. They might have much less flow requirement to initiate heating.
    Last edited by mgb74; 07-19-2010 at 09:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  3. #23
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,541
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by ralnphot View Post
    The reason I recommend electric tanks is the relative ease of installation. Its easier to run wire than gas lines to existing structures, not to mention much cheaper.
    'We choose to go to the moon, and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.'

    John F. Kennedy
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #24
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,541
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    There are very small electric units that plug into 120v outlet. I don't know where you are located but Home Depot (for example) has a couple of different 2.5gal. But you have to look at the amp draw and the wiring you have available. For example, the 2.5gal model draws 12.5 amps - which might be OK depending on the circuit. A 6 gal, 120v model draws 16.7 amps - too much for most existing home 120v wiring.

    Without going into too much detail, you probably have a 15amp circuit on 14 ga wiring (if in US). So the 6 gal will draw too much current. The 2.5gal would be ok IF there is not too much else drawing on that circuit when the water heater turns on. If your wiring is 12ga, you might have a 20amp breaker so you'll be OK with the 2.5gal and marginal with the 6 gal. Look at the circuit breaker in the box for that circuit and see if it's marked 15amp or 20amp.

    Another possibility might be one of the very small tankless heaters designed for under the sink cabinet. They might have much less flow requirement to initiate heating.
    I think with this you're back to the flow-rate problem, and don't even think about making consistent exposures when this thing kicks in.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    South Norfolk, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,885
    Images
    62
    Ralph,

    Imagine the power drop when a 9.5kW instant unit kicks in, even on 240V. There is three phase here but wiring sensitive items onto the spare phase would be complicated.

    Tom

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,280
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    I think with this you're back to the flow-rate problem, and don't even think about making consistent exposures when this thing kicks in.
    A very good point about a local "brown out" when either type of heater kicks in (assuming it's on the same circuit as enlarger). Best way to address would be to put water heater on it's own circuit. Another way to deal with this would be to switch off the water heater when using enlarger (this would only work with tank type), relying on the tank as a reservoir of hot water.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  7. #27
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,541
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    A very good point about a local "brown out" when either type of heater kicks in (assuming it's on the same circuit as enlarger). Best way to address would be to put water heater on it's own circuit. Another way to deal with this would be to switch off the water heater when using enlarger (this would only work with tank type), relying on the tank as a reservoir of hot water.
    I just don't know enough about electricity, so I have one question:

    Is putting the water heater onto its own circuit sufficient to stabilize the enlarger voltage on a different circuit if both are on the same fuse box?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #28
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    I learned some habbits from an old graphics art printer. He would fill his sink a home made galvanized steel affair - about 2' wide, 8' long, with about 3' of tempered water, and leave an overflow strainer in the drain in the corner to maintain the water level.

    The sink sat on a layer of high density foam insulation, but it would loose temp over time, gradually.

    When it was time to develop a panchro film (and I mean like 16x20 or so) before setting the time he would be sure the dev tray (stainless, floating in the water bath) and water bath were the same temp, and then adjust the needed developing time per a dial calculator from a Kodak darkroom dataguide.

    20C/68F is not a necessity, but consistency near 20C/68F is rather convnient. The large water bath meant that temp drift during the critical parts during total darkness flipping films in the tray the calculated time would not need to be changed.
    my real name, imagine that.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    832
    Images
    131
    I have a little hot pot which is sufficient to get distilled water to temperature for presoak and development, but not for wash. My understanding is that cold water is fine for washing films, so long as it's not 70f to 45-50f immediately. I could probably step it down with hot water mixed with cold tap, maybe in 5f increments.

    I'll look into the electric tank, 2.5 gal should be plenty.

  10. #30
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,541
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Ullsmith View Post
    ... My understanding is that cold water is fine for washing films ...
    Washing efficiency increases with water temperature, but a temperature between 20-25°C (68-77°F) is ideal. Higher washing temperatures soften the film emulsion and make it prone to handling damage. The wash water is best kept within 3°C of the film processing temperature to avoid reticulation, which is a distortion of the emulsion, caused by sudden changes in temperature. If you are unable to heat the wash water, prepare an intermediate water bath to provide a more gradual temperature change. If the water temperature falls below 20°C (68°F), increase the washing time and verify the washing efficiency through testing. Avoid washing temperatures below 10°C (50°F).
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin