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  1. #11
    Trond's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    I'd probably go with the fiberglass window screening material, but the plastic mesh netting would be just as good. The key here is to avoid metal screens as these will oxidize and can leave stains. I know the fiberglass ones will not, 'cause that's what I use. Fiberglass screening is a bit more dimensionally stable than the plastic garden mesh I've seen around here. It sags a bit when it gets warm. Fiberglass doesn't.
    I'll check out the plastic mesh netting if I don't find any suitable fiberglass. Window screens aren't very common here in Norway, but it's possible that the same product is used for other things as well. I will look around.

  2. #12
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    Trond,

    Very nice work. My own $00.02 worth of advice is to avoid using any urethane product. You will be surprised how quickly ordinary water will dissolve a plastic finish. A much better solution is traditional Tongue oil. I have used it on several bits of gear that are in my sink with water flowing over them at times, and the wood is good as new still.
    Tim N. Roscoe

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  3. #13

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    All my darkroom surfaces are finished with several coats of marine spar varnish (first coat cut in half with thinner to help penetration). At 20+ years old, they still look like they did when new, except developer will stain if left to dry, but the surface is still good.
    I second the fiberglass screens. I had some like this years ago (I hang my prints now), wooden frames. I just stacked them, but this will allow more air circulation. (I didn't finish the frames, never a problem.) You need to be able to clean the fiberglass with a weak clorox solution from time to time to eliminate contamination.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy View Post
    Trond,

    Very nice work. My own $00.02 worth of advice is to avoid using any urethane product. You will be surprised how quickly ordinary water will dissolve a plastic finish. A much better solution is traditional Tongue oil. I have used it on several bits of gear that are in my sink with water flowing over them at times, and the wood is good as new still.
    Are you serious? The counter tops in my darkroom are high density particle board finished with two coats of standard, run of the mill, glossy urethane finish. The same thing used for finishing wood floors. This stuff is tough. Everything gets spilled on it and in the 10 years that I've had this set up, nothing has damaged it. It doesn't look like the OP is going to be running water over this thing anyway, not that it would matter.
    Frank Schifano

  5. #15
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    Nice. I am going to building the same thing next week, from the same book! Hope mine comes out as well as yours did ...
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  6. #16
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    Building something is always good.
    However, this is a better picture of something simiilar to what I found. It is called a "Pan Rack" I put window screens in it.


  7. #17
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    It takes 5 or 6 coats of Tung Oil before it has any moisture resistance. Each coat take a long time to dry. Its protection is via penetration. There is a reason they use varnish on boats. I would use an epoxy finish, seals at the surface and last nearly forever. I have had a sink that I epoxied 30 years ago that still look about the same as the day I did it. Gave it away last year, still going strong in a new darkroom. Just my 2 cents
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Building something is always good.
    This is a better picture of what I found. It is called a "Pan Rack" I put window screens in it.

    Where did you find that? Looks like a bakery item.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  9. #19
    Trond's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Building something is always good.
    However, this is a better picture of something simiilar to what I found. It is called a "Pan Rack" I put window screens in it.

    This seem perfect for the job. Easier to keep clean and it has a nice industrial look ;-).

    Trond

  10. #20

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    Buy fiberglass screening.

    Test out the drying technique before commiting tons of time to screen construction.

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